Q & A with fashion brand RadaStyle

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RadaStyle

MM: Can you introduce your brand and yourself in a few sentences?

RadaStyle - is a name derived from the word joy (joy in Russian is "radost"). RadaStyle creates designs which plunge you into a state of joy. Style, convenience, and comfort are the main components of the brand. RadaStyle is designed for a confident lady who prefers an individual style.

MM: What sparked your interest in fashion design?

The ability to see the world in my own way, the desire to bring this vision into life through the creation of an image and thereby change it in the direction of beauty and style.

MM: Can you describe your creative process?

There is a state of mind in which there is a desire to touch colour and form. Images are born in the imagination that can create new states and emotion...

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MM: Where do you find inspiration in your day-to-day life?

A sunny morning, music in the car on the way to work, a conversation with a person, any positive emotion, the surrounding nature, family, children...

MM: What kind of questions do you ask yourself when you begin creating a collection?

Who am I creating for? What am I creating? And the main question - would I wear it myself?

MM: How did you learn the business of fashion?

In practice, studying the demand, observing and analyzing the surrounding reality, feeling and sometimes intuitively creating what people then happily wear.

MM: How do you find working as a designer in Belarus? Has the culture/surroundings affected your design aesthetic? Do you feel connected to your home?

Working as a designer in Belarus has its own specific features and some difficulties, but they are all surmountable.

I try to be equal to the global experience in the development of the fashion industry, but, of course, there is an influence on our local culture and the people around me.

My home is my fortress and the main thing for me is my family!  

MM: What is your favourite part of being a designer? What drives you to design?

Start, the birth of ideas, the feeling of emotions from the created image. What drives me to design? - The great desire to create joy and give it to the world.

MM: What is the inspiration behind your F/W19 collection which was showcased at Vancouver Fashion Week?

My inspiration behind my F/W19 collection is my great wish to see the world happy and joyful! In RadaStyle! 

MM: What is your favourite piece from the new collection?

The final part of the collection "Image for the red carpet". 

Follow RadaStyle on Instagram: @rada.style

Day 6 at Vancouver Fashion Week F/W19

Saturday, March 23rd, 2019–Vancouver, BC–From sustainable garments to traditional South Asian bridal wear, Saturday was a night of distinctive styles.

Hometown designer Ryan Li kicked off Saturday night’s events in front of a packed house at the David LamHall with ‘Redeem your soul’. Li presented a collection of experimental garments that incorporate elements of menswear and tailoring to create an eye-catching final product. Set to futuristic production, the collection established itself as avant-garde yet functional with a line of crisply cut garments in a metallic burgundy hue, which continued to drive the line alongside an exaggerated houndstooth pattern. The influence of menswear in the women's pieces was evident through structured shoulders and slim but composed silhouettes, with deconstructed sleeves adding depth. Consistent and dark, Li’s experience in atelier’s showed clearly as his collection established a strong tone for the night ahead. A surprise announcement marking Ryan Li as this year’s winner of the Nancy Mak award (a scholarship that recognizes up-and-coming British Columbia based designers awarded by VFW founder Jamal Abdourahman) drew applause from the crowd. Ryan Li will present his collection internationally with Global Fashion Collective.

British Columbia-based brand Sarah Runnalls Collection showcased a timeless contemporary collection under the designer’s own name. Set to a soothing soundtrack, the theme of the collection was apparent from the first look with fabrics in relaxed cuts and a distinct polka-dot pattern beginning the procession.Linear designs on the garments were also found marking the faces of models in a cohesive way. Long dresses with sections of tulle rounded out the latter half of the collection, as palettes remained consistently vibrant and playful throughout. The entire experience proved to be calming and intriguing, as Runnalls’ designs evoked a lazy West Coast spring day. Nothing was lazy about the quality of tailoring however, as the collection was notably well draped and exquisitely detailed.

Polish-based designer Pat Guzik left a strong impression with the presentation of “There were never flowers, there was fire”, a high-fashion inspired line with a deeper message of sustainability. Patterns and prints were inspired by a mixture of Slavic and Asian cultures, including original works by Polish illustrator Mateusz Kolek, and were arranged in unconventional shapes and cuts. The collection is based on using unwanted and damaged textiles to create new forms and this was evident with oversized and belted looks that utilized varied fabrics and silhouettes. Oversized garments were a consistent theme, as large hoodies in black and deep blue were accessorized with orange cinched belts and thick-soled slides. In several cases, excess fabric was hung from the garment in a patchwork fashion, giving due diligence to there purposed theme of the collection. As a whole, the overall effect was jolting without being brash, and showed a unique attention to sustainability in an industry often defined by waste.

Jessica Hu’s brand Jessture debuted a collection that stayed true to its label; ‘Cozy Serenity’ was a display of calming colour palettes and relaxed fits that remained remarkably well cut and formal for contemporary casual womenswear. The garments are meant to evoke ‘the feeling of waking leisurely in the afternoon of a long vacation’ and presented an array of soothing hues of lilac, mint and beige throughout. Most pieces were composed of wool and cotton blends with cinched waists and loosely tied belts providing structure to looks. Key pieces included a loosely cut dark green overcoat with faux fur lapels and wool blended cinch bottom lounge pants that exuded a sense of luxurious relaxation. Jessture brought the evening back to earth with a masterful blend of minimalistic cuts that look easily at place on both the boulevard and living room.

Alexandra Zofcin from US brand The House of AmZ presented ‘Self_ A Reflection’, a spiritual and artistic exploration into the emotions and experiences that make up the creation of the individual. Drawing inspiration from nature, this calm collection was made up of deep earthy tones and delicate natural fibres such as fine silks and organzas. Models graced the runway walking on their tiptoes holding delicate flowers, adding to the calmness exuding from the garments. The eco-conscious collection of dresses and blouses featured wing-cap sleeves, silk charmeuse pockets, woven linen, cream coloured culottes and ribbon straps which airily floated along the runway. The brand interweaves different materials and patterns, most notably seen in a remarkable iridescent skirt with hues of dark green and plum mixed with fresh cream-coloured linen.

Vancouver based brand EVAN CLAYTON filled the room with adrenaline with his new collection ‘LIK EHELL’, which fuses art and fashion to create a political, personal, and artistic expression. Smoke rolled out on the runway as models featured bold garments with a theatrical appeal. The collection drew on references to medieval armour and combat gear, all combined with feminine touches like exposing mesh, soft frills, and brocade designs to create sumptuous daredevil pieces. Deep crimson and somber black dominated the collection, which was further brought to life with intense maroon gems. Garments featured short dresses with shoulder pads, crotchless trousers, and corsets, accessorized with heavy metal belts used as straps, and even a silver sword.

Margot, by Japanese designer Hana Imai, showcases their debut collection of dresses, which was inspiredby women and aims to simplify their everyday outfits and lives. Imai uses calm neutrals and soft cotton fabrics to achieve light and airy simplicity. The prairie style dresses featured a wide style of necklines from deep v-necks to off-the-shoulder, and patterns ranging from plaid to polka dots were further lavished with light ruffles, lace, and puff sleeves. Included was a sophisticated take on the classic sweater dress made from soft tan wool. The hair looks were pieced together with low ponytails tied encased with thick ribbon.The melange of styles harmonized together to create graceful silhouettes, radiating the brand’s goal of simplicity.

Vancouver brand Sunny’s Bridal finished off the night with their dazzling collection ‘The Divine Feminine’.Choreographed to perfection, the show featured five sets of South Asian style lavish dresses, leaving the audience in awe. Each set featured soft silhouettes and colours ranging from fresh pastels and florals, metallics and bold hues, with the final set comprising of all-white, accented with silver sparkles. The luxurious dresses were all embellished with sparkling jewels, catching the light and glimmering as the models sauntered down the runway. Styles included two-piece sets and mermaid and A-line shapes, which were accessorized with detailed tassels, lace, fringes and flowing trains. The extravagant collection was the embodiment of strong women as female anthems played in the background and feminist messages were held on placards.

Photos by Filippo Fior / Imaxtree.com

Day 3 at Vancouver Fashion Week F/W 19

Wednesday, March 20th, 2019 – Vancouver, BC – Wednesday was a night with a focus on Canadian designers, from BC to Ontario.

Eight designers from the Vancouver Community College’s Fashion Design & Production Diploma showcased their work to kick off Wednesday’s events. Collections ranged from 60’s inspired menswear to draping southeast Asian linen gowns and tech-focused garments in dark palettes. Each student brought a unique twist to their production, with engaging storylines and explosive soundtracks used throughout. Highlights included a scene straight from the dressing room with Astrid Shapiro, a cinematic display of power and rebirth from Sanaz Azad, and a royal inspired line from Mahnaz Gooya. The works reflected two years of hard work by the cohort, and a strong argument for engaging new fashion designers coming out of Vancouver.

The Atira Women’s Resource Society presented a collection from their EWMA (Enterprising Women Making Art) initiative, which supports women artists and artisans in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. The collection turned heads by beginning with multicoloured fur vest pieces and a long flowing aqua gown. Handcrafted accessories showcased the breadth of skills possessed by EWMA members, with various jewellery pieces and a floral and leopard-printed bandana adding depth to looks. Exquisitely woven knits completed a well-varied collection from hardworking artisans in the EWMA’s fourth consecutive year of being featured on the catwalk at Vancouver Fashion Week.

The Nöelziñia line crafted by Ontario based designer Noele Baptista was a striking collection of florals, gentle ruffles and heavy drapes. This rustic assortment was based on the idea of preserving beautiful memories, like flowers pressed between the pages of a treasured book, hence the collections name ‘Fleurs presses’. A violin played in the background while models with flower crowns worn on long, softly curled hair walked the runway in a dream-like trance. The clothing was ethereal and dreamy, the epitome of femininity. Flowers were elegantly pinned on the clothing, punctuating each thoughtfully placed ruffle. A few of the articles were gently frayed at the ends, giving an opulent bohemian feeling. Smooth silk and chiffon with hints of rich velvet created a stunning experience for the audience.

The Su Moda Collection, Ottawa’s first leading modest fashion brand, was created by mother and daughter duo Samra Mohamed & Fathia Mohamed, bringing a powerful eastern influence onto the catwalk. Poised models in long flowing blush tone garments sashayed down the runway to the beat of rich Arabic music. There were stiff materials with intricate golden embroidery merged with pastel tones of silk and linen, which were carefully selected from Dubai, Kuwait and New Delhi creating a beautiful canopy of gorgeous colour and lush fabrics. The models donned luxurious headpieces embellished in eye-catching stones and pearls, with only their eyes visible. Some of their robes were gently tied around their waist, the tassels swaying as they walked, other robes were left open, to flow fiercely behind them. The garments were modest yet eye-catching, creating a breathtaking flow of beautiful pieces of art

Rowes Fashion, a Canadian brand by Rebecca Rowe, showcased a cute and incredibly wearable collection. 'Solid Ground' opened with a short, plaid mini skirt partnered with a lacy, see-through top. It specialized in the pairing of unlikely patterns such as lace, plaid and dark florals throughout. A collection of skirts, cocktail dresses and casual jackets, the collection took simple silhouettes and made them stand-apart through the mix of patterns and small lace detailing on hems and sleeves.

Egyptian designer Nada Marzouk for Authentique transported the audience into an ancient world. 'Divine Adoratrice', inspired by the female-forward Egyptian Dynasty XVIII, fused a number of eye-grabbing details such as silver sequins, midnight sparkles, and graphics that depicted Egyptian architecture. Featuring a number of looks that ranged from day wear to shimmering evening wear, the collection also played with dimensions through juxtaposed hemlines. The line also featured a number of the brand's signature slippers. Despite being inspired by an ancient dynasty, the line was nevertheless accessible to the stylish, modern woman.

Soojinu, a label created by BC-based designer Soojin Woo, drew from Woo's rich Korean heritage to create a unique collection that was inspired by Shamanism. The collection utilized the traditional Shaman colours of red, blue, yellow and green to create a moody and curious showcase. Featuring a range of male and female models, the collection transcended gender roles through placing male models in tight, almost mermaid silhouette skirts in addition to leotards crisscrossed with yellow sequin sashes. Using a variety of materials, such as leather, fur and denim, the beauty and depth of The East was brought to the VFW runway.

Gracing the runway for both the Atira Women’s Resource Society and Rowes Fashion shows, Kidist, an 18-year-old from Toronto, lived her dreams by modelling at Vancouver Fashion Week. Through the Make-A-Wish foundation, Kidist, who is living with an immune deficiency, was able to have her absolute one true wish, to be a fashion model, come true at Vancouver Fashion Week.

Photo credit: Filippo Fior / Imaxtree.com.

Q & A with fashion brand Ming Studio

Designer Ming, graduated from the Beijing Institute of Fashion Design, with a degree in sewing. “Ming” was established and became an independent brand in 2015.

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MING STUDIO

Taiwan based fashion brand

MM: Can you introduce your brand and yourself in a few sentences?

I like to use a combination of simple and complex styles to create my designs. I am not afraid of the existing international clothing brands on the market because I believe I have created the best brand. I like to design and hand craft each piece of clothing so that it is original, innovative, and comfortable to wear. I want to be the Kusama Yayoi of the fashion world. While I may have seemed inconspicuous in the past, I am confident in my designs.

MM: What sparked your interest in fashion design?

When I was in high school, I liked Kusama Yayoi 's works of art and it inspired me to pursue art as a career. My family disapproved of me going into art and design so I ultimately chose fashion design. I began to learn how to draw, design and produce fashion pieces. Soon after that, designing clothes became my life!

MM: Can you describe your creative process?

I like to feel the material before drawing the design. The texture of it will sometimes bring me inspiration and I will visualize the design. Each process, from drafting to the final stage, is carefully crafted. Each design is different and has its own unique personal style.

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MM: Where do you find inspiration in your day-to-day life?

I like to seek inspiration in my daily life and emotions. I like to travel alone to places I want to go just to see if something will catch my eye. Every aspect of my creations is closely related to the connections between people and the emotions that arise from human interaction.

MM: What kind of questions do you ask yourself when you begin creating a collection?

Before I start designing a collection I ask myself , “What do I want to express with my collection?” “What message do I want to send across?”

MM: How did you learn the business of fashion?

Before I started designing, I didn't know what fashion design entailed since I was just an art student. Most of my experience was in drawing and calligraphy. In high school, I began to learn how to design clothes and accessories. I designed, made, and honed my craft and I found that I love designing clothes. In order to improve my skills, I left my comfort zone and moved to Beijing to study at the Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology (BIFT).  This gave me a much better understanding of the fashion industry. BIFT gave me the opportunity to learn more about fashion as well as inspired me to continue my love for designing.

MM: How do you find working as a designer in Taiwan? Has the culture/surroundings affected your design aesthetic? Do you feel connected to your home?

After being back from Beijing, I worked as a women's wear design assistant and I found that I didn’t enjoy working on design styles that I wouldn’t wear myself. I decided to quit my job to become an independent designer and create my own design and studio. It didn’t run as smoothly as I hoped. My family opposed the brand I had created, and expected me to become a civil servant. Being stubborn and not satisfied with the constraints of my parents, I continued to create my own brand.  When I returned to my hometown, I found that every place has its own culture and aesthetics. The many memories of my early childhood all deeply affect my designs.

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MM: What is your favourite part of being a designer? What drives you to design?

I like to draw my own designs and the freedom that brings.


MM: What is the inspiration behind your F/W19 collection to be showcased at Vancouver Fashion Week?

My inspiration comes from my childhood memories. My grandmother always likes to carry colourful bags and take me to the market to buy vegetables. She’ll go to the tangerine shop and buy me my favorite snack “Prince noodles”. I like the bright and transparent packaging of the “Prince Noodles” snacks. I grew up to know a simple and retro bag that we called “Eggplant bag”.  I want to put the color of the bag, material, and my favorite “Prince” face packaging color design into my clothing so that each piece of clothing is retro yet stylish, and nostalgic yet comfortable.

MM: What is your favourite piece from the new collection?

I like all the pieces from my collection. If I really had to pick one, I like the “Nostalgic Retro Tricolor” piece.

Check out MING Studio on Instagram: @ming_design_studio