Day 6 at Vancouver Fashion Week F/W19

Saturday, March 23rd, 2019–Vancouver, BC–From sustainable garments to traditional South Asian bridal wear, Saturday was a night of distinctive styles.

Hometown designer Ryan Li kicked off Saturday night’s events in front of a packed house at the David LamHall with ‘Redeem your soul’. Li presented a collection of experimental garments that incorporate elements of menswear and tailoring to create an eye-catching final product. Set to futuristic production, the collection established itself as avant-garde yet functional with a line of crisply cut garments in a metallic burgundy hue, which continued to drive the line alongside an exaggerated houndstooth pattern. The influence of menswear in the women's pieces was evident through structured shoulders and slim but composed silhouettes, with deconstructed sleeves adding depth. Consistent and dark, Li’s experience in atelier’s showed clearly as his collection established a strong tone for the night ahead. A surprise announcement marking Ryan Li as this year’s winner of the Nancy Mak award (a scholarship that recognizes up-and-coming British Columbia based designers awarded by VFW founder Jamal Abdourahman) drew applause from the crowd. Ryan Li will present his collection internationally with Global Fashion Collective.

British Columbia-based brand Sarah Runnalls Collection showcased a timeless contemporary collection under the designer’s own name. Set to a soothing soundtrack, the theme of the collection was apparent from the first look with fabrics in relaxed cuts and a distinct polka-dot pattern beginning the procession.Linear designs on the garments were also found marking the faces of models in a cohesive way. Long dresses with sections of tulle rounded out the latter half of the collection, as palettes remained consistently vibrant and playful throughout. The entire experience proved to be calming and intriguing, as Runnalls’ designs evoked a lazy West Coast spring day. Nothing was lazy about the quality of tailoring however, as the collection was notably well draped and exquisitely detailed.

Polish-based designer Pat Guzik left a strong impression with the presentation of “There were never flowers, there was fire”, a high-fashion inspired line with a deeper message of sustainability. Patterns and prints were inspired by a mixture of Slavic and Asian cultures, including original works by Polish illustrator Mateusz Kolek, and were arranged in unconventional shapes and cuts. The collection is based on using unwanted and damaged textiles to create new forms and this was evident with oversized and belted looks that utilized varied fabrics and silhouettes. Oversized garments were a consistent theme, as large hoodies in black and deep blue were accessorized with orange cinched belts and thick-soled slides. In several cases, excess fabric was hung from the garment in a patchwork fashion, giving due diligence to there purposed theme of the collection. As a whole, the overall effect was jolting without being brash, and showed a unique attention to sustainability in an industry often defined by waste.

Jessica Hu’s brand Jessture debuted a collection that stayed true to its label; ‘Cozy Serenity’ was a display of calming colour palettes and relaxed fits that remained remarkably well cut and formal for contemporary casual womenswear. The garments are meant to evoke ‘the feeling of waking leisurely in the afternoon of a long vacation’ and presented an array of soothing hues of lilac, mint and beige throughout. Most pieces were composed of wool and cotton blends with cinched waists and loosely tied belts providing structure to looks. Key pieces included a loosely cut dark green overcoat with faux fur lapels and wool blended cinch bottom lounge pants that exuded a sense of luxurious relaxation. Jessture brought the evening back to earth with a masterful blend of minimalistic cuts that look easily at place on both the boulevard and living room.

Alexandra Zofcin from US brand The House of AmZ presented ‘Self_ A Reflection’, a spiritual and artistic exploration into the emotions and experiences that make up the creation of the individual. Drawing inspiration from nature, this calm collection was made up of deep earthy tones and delicate natural fibres such as fine silks and organzas. Models graced the runway walking on their tiptoes holding delicate flowers, adding to the calmness exuding from the garments. The eco-conscious collection of dresses and blouses featured wing-cap sleeves, silk charmeuse pockets, woven linen, cream coloured culottes and ribbon straps which airily floated along the runway. The brand interweaves different materials and patterns, most notably seen in a remarkable iridescent skirt with hues of dark green and plum mixed with fresh cream-coloured linen.

Vancouver based brand EVAN CLAYTON filled the room with adrenaline with his new collection ‘LIK EHELL’, which fuses art and fashion to create a political, personal, and artistic expression. Smoke rolled out on the runway as models featured bold garments with a theatrical appeal. The collection drew on references to medieval armour and combat gear, all combined with feminine touches like exposing mesh, soft frills, and brocade designs to create sumptuous daredevil pieces. Deep crimson and somber black dominated the collection, which was further brought to life with intense maroon gems. Garments featured short dresses with shoulder pads, crotchless trousers, and corsets, accessorized with heavy metal belts used as straps, and even a silver sword.

Margot, by Japanese designer Hana Imai, showcases their debut collection of dresses, which was inspiredby women and aims to simplify their everyday outfits and lives. Imai uses calm neutrals and soft cotton fabrics to achieve light and airy simplicity. The prairie style dresses featured a wide style of necklines from deep v-necks to off-the-shoulder, and patterns ranging from plaid to polka dots were further lavished with light ruffles, lace, and puff sleeves. Included was a sophisticated take on the classic sweater dress made from soft tan wool. The hair looks were pieced together with low ponytails tied encased with thick ribbon.The melange of styles harmonized together to create graceful silhouettes, radiating the brand’s goal of simplicity.

Vancouver brand Sunny’s Bridal finished off the night with their dazzling collection ‘The Divine Feminine’.Choreographed to perfection, the show featured five sets of South Asian style lavish dresses, leaving the audience in awe. Each set featured soft silhouettes and colours ranging from fresh pastels and florals, metallics and bold hues, with the final set comprising of all-white, accented with silver sparkles. The luxurious dresses were all embellished with sparkling jewels, catching the light and glimmering as the models sauntered down the runway. Styles included two-piece sets and mermaid and A-line shapes, which were accessorized with detailed tassels, lace, fringes and flowing trains. The extravagant collection was the embodiment of strong women as female anthems played in the background and feminist messages were held on placards.

Photos by Filippo Fior / Imaxtree.com

Day 5 at Vancouver Fashion Week F/W19

Friday, March 22nd, 2019–Vancouver, BC–Friday night was a sensation, with a multitude of styles presented by designers hailing from Canada to New Zealand.

Local Vancouver designer Amy Herndon from IZATION STUDIO presented her visionary collection [Popularity Contest], which aims to expose and break down societal norms. Herndon’s line embodies this idea through its experimental composition, technical approach, and urban streetwear influence. The unisex garments transcended gender roles as male models donned the runway wearing ankle-length skirts and females wore baggy hoodies, dark makeup was worn by both. Fabrics that were interlaced with unconventional zippers and quotes like: ”we don’t clique” and “conformation”. Herndon intertwines function and form, combining soft textures and layers to create clean-cuts and boxy, relaxed shapes in hooded sweaters and loose-fitting pants. Most notable was a bright yellow floor-length puffer jacket paired with cobalt blue baggy trousers.

Ay Lelum-The House of Good Design, a line crafted byB.C. based sisters Aunalee and Sophia, presented their enchanting new collection, The K’wuyucun~Grizzly Bear. The sisters drew inspiration from Coast Salish culture and their family story originating from the ethereal GrizzlyBear, which was encapsulated in the pieces by the incorporation of intergenerational Coast Salish art. Garments featured nature-inspired colours, with shades of sage, turquoise and muted yellows, all infused with calming neutral tones. Floor-length column dresses of silky, metallic fabrics danced on the runway, alluding to an image of a flowing river while velvet top sand jackets lined with fur seemed to mimic a bear’s delicate coat. Also featured were draping shawls and hooded capes with embroidered intricate Coast Salish designs. Their showcase of wearable Indigenous art garments was a modern day storytelling of ancient traditions which left the audience in awe.

Emelia’s Swimwear, a Canadian brand by Emelie Hausler, transported the audience to a tropical holiday through their collection of luxury swimwear. Energetic and playful models worked the runway wearing flirtatious bikinis, interacting with each other and taking the spontaneous selfie. Hausler draws colour inspiration from her travels, resulting in diverse shades ranging from earthy tones to vibrant and bright hues which caught the eyes of the audience. The reversible swimwear was interlaced with modest mesh inserts, playful zipper sand feminine belts and braids, keeping each piece a balance between functional and stylish.The show finished with a dazzling finale as the models strutted down the runway for the last time collectively in head-turning bright fuchsia pieces.

The first of a presentation by Apparel Magazine, Bradley Smit’s collection personified the discolouration of glaciers. Through fabric, he imitated nature, starting with soft whites and blues that progress to increasingly darker silhouettes. The collection by the New Zealand based designer featured an array of gowns, floating blouses, and wide pant jumpsuits highlighted by hand-dyed elements of blue. While Smit channelled the ocean, Wairata presented wonderfully floral silk details that decorated dresses reminiscent of 1920s flapper girls, modernized with asymmetrical hemlines. The collection was wonderfully seductive with dresses that exposed the shoulders and included sequin details. The final collection presented by Apparel Magazine, from Aania, showcased a collection of tailored dresses, pants and tops exclusively in deep green, white and classic stripes. The show finale featured an exquisitely feminine, eye-grabbing silk dress.

Consulate General of the Republic of Indonesia presented a show that exposed the rich, diverse and beautiful fabrics to be found across Indonesia. NY by Novita Yunus offered three pieces that featured a royal, golden, traditional Indonesian pattern and a sweeping red sash juxtaposed with modern silhouettes in a blazer, v-neck dress, and A-line dress. Bernada communicated Indonesia's rich variety of fabrics through a line generous in material that expertly mixed and matched patterns. The items themselves, while often traditional tunics, vest and skirts, felt stylish and accessible with modern accessories and muted colours.

Faun, by Canadian designer Marisa P. Clark presented a wonderfully wearable collection this evening. A robustly feminine line featuring silk dresses, wide-legged pink pants and a suede jacket, the items stood apart due to a diverse colour palette of pink, teal, red, and blue. Clark added texture and dimension through details such as pearls, gold trim, gloves with fluffy cuffs and the brand’s signature antlers. The line looked sensual and flirty passing down the runway but would easily translate into any young woman’s office and social wardrobe.

HAMON, a Japanese brand created by Kumiko Iwano, showcased innovative and masterful craftsmanship through an extensive line exclusively made from fragments of fabric and materials left over from her last 10 years of production. ‘RE:incarnation’, a collection that spoke to the themes of memory and rebirth, started with a bright, eye-grabbing red dress and moved throughout a rich palette of black, grey and purple to conclude with beautiful white dresses.Most of the items featured one colour but added incredible texture through recycled fabric sewn upon the items in numerous ways, including raw and frayed strips, hemline tassels, patches and folds. Keeping the traditional Kimono silhouette of long jackets and robes with wide sleeves overlong pants or skirts, Iwano’s collection looked effortlessly elegant and, while innovative and creative, perfectly comfortable and wearable

Photos by Filippo Fior / Imaxtree.com

Day 2 at Vancouver Fashion Week F/W19

Tuesday, March 19th, 2019 – Vancouver, BC – Tuesday was a night to showcase unique and show stopping collections with experimental fabrics and plays on scale.

The second day of Vancouver Fashion Week opened with ‘Celestial’, a resort-wear collection by Melissa Yin of Mel Elegance. Melissa is Chinese-Canadian and brings a multicultural aesthetic and minimalist comfort to luxury resort-wear. Inspired by a summer spent in Alaska Delaney National Park, Melissa’s designs are defined by flowing silhouettes and warm floral patterns in silk and linen. The sounds and sights of Alaskan wildlife are reflected through colour and detail in a collection that transitions steadily from black and floral ruffles to white lace. Rounding out the tone of the show were floor-length dresses in soft pinks and bright reds. Thoroughly accessorized, outfits were completed with bright blue and pink straw beach bags.

Next was Tyler Alan Jacobs of the TAJ House of Talents. A member of the Squamish First Nation, Jacobs creates traditional Coast Salish wear integrated with modern fabrics and cuts. His collection moved through form-hugging black and gold pieces to flowing cape silhouettes in black and cherry. Looks were completed with ombre yellow-red face markings and berry-red lips. Tyler highlighted his work with traditional First Nations motifs beaded ornately on dresses and skirts. The show concluded in dramatic fashion, as the final model strode down the runway and untied her motif-accented red cape, approaching the cameras with the textile around her waist.

Much like last season, Profanity by LillzKillz lived up to its name. The scandalous collection by BC based, 21 year old designer featured a range of diverse models who descended on the runway in attire unlike anything else seen so far. Drawing from the fashion culture of extreme snow sports, items included park rat oversized hoodies juxtaposed with tight mini dresses that, on one occasion, exposed the entire back and backside of the model. LillzKillz maintained no regard for gender roles, placing models in a mix of different pieces. An electric palette of bright orange, yellow and a graphic design that harkened back to 90s snowboarding culture fought for attention with an array of opaque, puffy and stark white fur fabrics. The result was eccentric and, need we say it, profane.

Camilla & Castillo, a sexually charged line from Venezuelan designer Camilla Castillo, featured an array of fitted pieces that celebrated the forms and curves of the female figure. The collection played with geometric compositions through multi-level hems and crisscrossing linear designs. Metallic accessories, studs and careful cut-outs created a line that is multi-dimensional and contradictory. The overall effect was to turn simple silhouettes, such as the pencil skirt and crop top, into pieces that are sexy, statement, and runway ready.

The Radastyle collection, by Belarusian designer Tatsiana Sychova, was the epitome of timeless, beautiful elegance. 'Orbit of Time' utilized classic, flattering silhouettes in sensual fabrics that stood apart with a mastery of fine details. Stunning floating dresses in silk and satin glided down the runway abated by eye catching necklines, ruffled sleeves, detailed waistlines and hemlines generously cut on the bias. The collection was coherent, elegant, and modest all while being breathtakingly sensual.

Japanese designer Michiko Ueda presented her brand GLAZE KOHL’s second collection, which displayed Michiko’s 20 years of experience as the proprietor of a vintage shop in Osaka, Japan. This collection was inspired by the colour of Japanese spring, with Michiko showing a mastery of woollen and velvet material. The pieces suggested a refined persona while still retaining playfulness, using soft silhouettes and muted palettes. A cheerful and barefooted model underscored this message, leading attendees to break into applause for the well-tenured designer who should be well-watched for any further additions to her brand.

17-year-old Vancouver-based designer Ming Lim from CRAZYYABAI closed off Tuesday’s events with a memorable showing of her collection ‘Sophrosyne’ exploring the idea of self-peace. This work is said to have surfaced from a period of self-realization and growth in Ming’s life, and features avant-garde looks that grab the attention of the viewer and convey a captivating message about the designer. Fantasy imagery is consistent throughout the line. Transparent materials stitched next to flowing legwear leave the model equally concealed and revealed, suggesting a feeling of veiled confusion. A mural-like printed train with an image of a heart being held by a weeping figure closed out a truly provocative show by the remarkable young designer.

Q & A with fashion brand 6-D Sebastian Masuda

MM: Can you introduce your brand and yourself in a few sentences?

「6-D Sebastian Masuda」 is the new fashion brand which artist, Masuda Sebastian, launched. The name derives from Six dimension and Six sense. This time I would like to display again what I would like to express through fashion by exhibiting the items of the shop "6% DOKIDOKI" that I opened at Harajuku in Tokyo when I was 25 years old.

 

MM: Can you describe your creative process?

First of all, I document messages that I would like to express when I create pieces. This is my process of creation which I shape keywords that I picked visually.

 

MM: Where do you find inspiration in your day-to-day life?

I get inspirations that is based on the news (global situation and global issues) which is currently happening, and what do we need for this generation?

 

MM: What kind of questions do you ask yourself when you begin creating a collection?

 Collection theme of this time is ”Reboot the Kawaii”. I made a collection based on the idea that what is fashion as protecting the spirits of "Kawaii" which is the context of my creation. It is also an attempt to restart what was sent to the world as a result of my work again with my own hand.


MM: How has your work evolved since you began your own label?

Till now I had a store as existence to receive and transmit the flow and energy which was born from the street in Tokyo, but I switched to capture fashion as "art as a body "  by setting up a fashion brand with my name again.

 

MM: How do you find working as a designer in Japan? Has the culture/surroundings affected your design aesthetic? Do you feel connected to your home?

Since I started "6% DOKIDOKI" in 1995, my career as a fashion designer started. A feeling of air atmosphere  that allows others to live freely in the city of Harajuku in Tokyo, and street fashion that is unprecedented in the world.It is a fundamental indispensable element to create my pieces(art of production).

 

MM: What sparked your interest in fashion design?

The most interesting part is material. My art work creates colors using materials that exist in the world that I have found in various clothing and toy markets in the world. However, I decide on the main material that matches the theme in fashion design and start designing to do. We have just launched the brand, but we will try to create that material itself and develop new materials in the future as well.

MM: How did you learn the business of fashion?

I started my store (6% DOKIDOKI) as a place of expression, I was unknowing at first. For the first time in terms of shop management, I learnt fashion business and management by practice through various experiences with crossover intersecting streets.


MM: What is your favourite part of being a designer? What drives you to design?

 「Design」 is visualizing messages for me.  It is my job to design what kind of place someone goes with their clothes, what kind of stimulation it gives them around, and someone's consciousness can be changed by communications from the clothes as my point of origin.



MM: What is the inspiration behind your S/S19 collection to be showcased at Vancouver Fashion Week?

This collection has the purpose of restarting the image and recognition of the current state of "Kawaii" that is going to be consumed as a surface trend by third party intervention. The Japanese culture "Kawaii" which is the context of my work often precedes superficial images such as ,gaudiness, bizarre and childishness, and the problems of "diversity" and "individuality" recently taken. It is not well known that you have big hints to unravel the word. I define Kawaii = my microcosm. A strong will to protect your favorite things that everyone does not want to disturb, and a mind to allow other people 's microcosm (personality),What I express this time is to protect faith as the basis of such "Kawaii"

Thank you 6-D Sebastian Masuda for telling us about your brand. We can't wait to see your show at Vancouver Fashion Week for the SS19 season.

Follow 6-D Sebastian Masuda on Instagram @6d_tokyo and check out the website.

Q & A with fashion brand THE MONGOLIANCHOPPSSS

MM: Can you introduce your brand and yourself in a few sentences? 

We are operating THE MONGOLIANCHOPPSSS by 2 designers, KIMIHIKO ANDO & KENTA YAMAMOTO. We started the production of ZINE in 2011, then we officially began the dressmaking with seasons theme from 2014. Our design is based on the  expressing our impressions 「Having fun」 with the” pride of being Japanese”.

 

MM: Can you describe your creative process?

We normally starts the process of dressmaking from small talks. Images of dressmaking that we would like to make next is coming up with talking so many random things. We reconcile those images into one image, seeking words for next seasons, then we make collections which is based on the words at the end.

 

MM: Where do you find inspiration in your day-to-day life?

We are inspired by 「spontaneous affairs in a daily life」 such as commuter trains and small talks, getting inspirations except for fashion stuff happens a lot to us. When it comes to our designs, we get inspirations by used clothes many times. We look around thrift shops in the U.S. and Japanese recycle shops in japan periodically in order to look for another stimulus.

 

MM: What kind of questions do you ask yourself when you begin creating a collection?

When we start making collections, we sometimes ask to myself whether 「Are we actually having fun」 during productions, so our concept for collection is we can’t entertain other people, if we don’t enjoy it on our own.

 

MM: How has your work evolved since you began your own label?

We don’t evolve, but our passion is swelling up in progress.

 

MM: How do you find working as a designer in Japan? Has the culture/surroundings affected your design aesthetic? Do you feel connected to your home?

We were born in Japan and living as Japanese, so we don’t think any specific or special things as designers  who active in Japan.

 

MM: What sparked your interest in fashion design?

Passion.

 

MM: How did you learn the business of fashion?

Both of us graduated at the apparel academy. Even though we had experienced as shop clerks, we established our brand with no idea about branding. We are getting helped by a variety of people,  managing our brand and speculating ideas day by day on our own so as to keep our operation appropriately.

 

MM: What is your favourite part of being a designer? What drives you to design?

We put our heart and feelings as a design of clothes and we can get empathy and opinions from those who wear them and we can do it indirectly.

Fashion has the opportunity to be touched by everyone, it is the privilege of the designer that is involved in it, I think that it will lead to rewarding as well.

 

MM: What is the inspiration behind your S/S19 collection to be showcased at Vancouver Fashion Week?

It is a personal part of Japanese people.

For example, a humble posture and a serious posture. . .

 

Thank you for telling us about your journey into fashion design. We can't wait to see THE MONGOLIANCHOPPSSS show at Vancouver Fashion Week for the SS19 season.

Follow THE MONGOLIANCHOPPSSS on Instagram @themongolianchoppsss and check out the website http://themongolianchoppsss.com/.