YONFA- a style free from fuss

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YONFA

A style free from fuss

Kim Yonghwa presented her captivating new collection at Vancouver Fashion Week (VFW) for the F/W 2019 Season. The featured brand is simple and elegant. It promotes a style free from fuss whereby fashionable women can fluidly and comfortably step up their everyday style.

True to it’s simple and elegant ethos, YONFA focuses on basic materials such as wool, knit and cotton. The theme colours are black, grey, white, and navy. Due to popularity in the 2018 Vancouver Fashion Week show, Kim Yonghwa has added more outerwear, knits and shirts to the collection.

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The collection forms the foundation of a woman's wardrobe, each piece is a building block upon which a new look can be created. It is an elegant and simple canvas that can showcase individual style through accessories.

ABOUT DESIGNER

Born and raised in Japan by Korean immigrants, Yonghwa’s work is inspired by this diverse and rich cultural background. Since establishing YONFA in 2016, the label has always celebrated Japanese fashion while employing Korean production methods to create clothing that compliments a woman’s body and lifestyle.

Follow YONFA on social media: yonfa_jp and check out their website: yonfa-fashion.com

Read the full interview here-

Q&A with fashion brand Yonfa

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Photographs by Wendy J Photography

Day 6 at Vancouver Fashion Week F/W19

Saturday, March 23rd, 2019–Vancouver, BC–From sustainable garments to traditional South Asian bridal wear, Saturday was a night of distinctive styles.

Hometown designer Ryan Li kicked off Saturday night’s events in front of a packed house at the David LamHall with ‘Redeem your soul’. Li presented a collection of experimental garments that incorporate elements of menswear and tailoring to create an eye-catching final product. Set to futuristic production, the collection established itself as avant-garde yet functional with a line of crisply cut garments in a metallic burgundy hue, which continued to drive the line alongside an exaggerated houndstooth pattern. The influence of menswear in the women's pieces was evident through structured shoulders and slim but composed silhouettes, with deconstructed sleeves adding depth. Consistent and dark, Li’s experience in atelier’s showed clearly as his collection established a strong tone for the night ahead. A surprise announcement marking Ryan Li as this year’s winner of the Nancy Mak award (a scholarship that recognizes up-and-coming British Columbia based designers awarded by VFW founder Jamal Abdourahman) drew applause from the crowd. Ryan Li will present his collection internationally with Global Fashion Collective.

British Columbia-based brand Sarah Runnalls Collection showcased a timeless contemporary collection under the designer’s own name. Set to a soothing soundtrack, the theme of the collection was apparent from the first look with fabrics in relaxed cuts and a distinct polka-dot pattern beginning the procession.Linear designs on the garments were also found marking the faces of models in a cohesive way. Long dresses with sections of tulle rounded out the latter half of the collection, as palettes remained consistently vibrant and playful throughout. The entire experience proved to be calming and intriguing, as Runnalls’ designs evoked a lazy West Coast spring day. Nothing was lazy about the quality of tailoring however, as the collection was notably well draped and exquisitely detailed.

Polish-based designer Pat Guzik left a strong impression with the presentation of “There were never flowers, there was fire”, a high-fashion inspired line with a deeper message of sustainability. Patterns and prints were inspired by a mixture of Slavic and Asian cultures, including original works by Polish illustrator Mateusz Kolek, and were arranged in unconventional shapes and cuts. The collection is based on using unwanted and damaged textiles to create new forms and this was evident with oversized and belted looks that utilized varied fabrics and silhouettes. Oversized garments were a consistent theme, as large hoodies in black and deep blue were accessorized with orange cinched belts and thick-soled slides. In several cases, excess fabric was hung from the garment in a patchwork fashion, giving due diligence to there purposed theme of the collection. As a whole, the overall effect was jolting without being brash, and showed a unique attention to sustainability in an industry often defined by waste.

Jessica Hu’s brand Jessture debuted a collection that stayed true to its label; ‘Cozy Serenity’ was a display of calming colour palettes and relaxed fits that remained remarkably well cut and formal for contemporary casual womenswear. The garments are meant to evoke ‘the feeling of waking leisurely in the afternoon of a long vacation’ and presented an array of soothing hues of lilac, mint and beige throughout. Most pieces were composed of wool and cotton blends with cinched waists and loosely tied belts providing structure to looks. Key pieces included a loosely cut dark green overcoat with faux fur lapels and wool blended cinch bottom lounge pants that exuded a sense of luxurious relaxation. Jessture brought the evening back to earth with a masterful blend of minimalistic cuts that look easily at place on both the boulevard and living room.

Alexandra Zofcin from US brand The House of AmZ presented ‘Self_ A Reflection’, a spiritual and artistic exploration into the emotions and experiences that make up the creation of the individual. Drawing inspiration from nature, this calm collection was made up of deep earthy tones and delicate natural fibres such as fine silks and organzas. Models graced the runway walking on their tiptoes holding delicate flowers, adding to the calmness exuding from the garments. The eco-conscious collection of dresses and blouses featured wing-cap sleeves, silk charmeuse pockets, woven linen, cream coloured culottes and ribbon straps which airily floated along the runway. The brand interweaves different materials and patterns, most notably seen in a remarkable iridescent skirt with hues of dark green and plum mixed with fresh cream-coloured linen.

Vancouver based brand EVAN CLAYTON filled the room with adrenaline with his new collection ‘LIK EHELL’, which fuses art and fashion to create a political, personal, and artistic expression. Smoke rolled out on the runway as models featured bold garments with a theatrical appeal. The collection drew on references to medieval armour and combat gear, all combined with feminine touches like exposing mesh, soft frills, and brocade designs to create sumptuous daredevil pieces. Deep crimson and somber black dominated the collection, which was further brought to life with intense maroon gems. Garments featured short dresses with shoulder pads, crotchless trousers, and corsets, accessorized with heavy metal belts used as straps, and even a silver sword.

Margot, by Japanese designer Hana Imai, showcases their debut collection of dresses, which was inspiredby women and aims to simplify their everyday outfits and lives. Imai uses calm neutrals and soft cotton fabrics to achieve light and airy simplicity. The prairie style dresses featured a wide style of necklines from deep v-necks to off-the-shoulder, and patterns ranging from plaid to polka dots were further lavished with light ruffles, lace, and puff sleeves. Included was a sophisticated take on the classic sweater dress made from soft tan wool. The hair looks were pieced together with low ponytails tied encased with thick ribbon.The melange of styles harmonized together to create graceful silhouettes, radiating the brand’s goal of simplicity.

Vancouver brand Sunny’s Bridal finished off the night with their dazzling collection ‘The Divine Feminine’.Choreographed to perfection, the show featured five sets of South Asian style lavish dresses, leaving the audience in awe. Each set featured soft silhouettes and colours ranging from fresh pastels and florals, metallics and bold hues, with the final set comprising of all-white, accented with silver sparkles. The luxurious dresses were all embellished with sparkling jewels, catching the light and glimmering as the models sauntered down the runway. Styles included two-piece sets and mermaid and A-line shapes, which were accessorized with detailed tassels, lace, fringes and flowing trains. The extravagant collection was the embodiment of strong women as female anthems played in the background and feminist messages were held on placards.

Photos by Filippo Fior / Imaxtree.com

Day 5 at Vancouver Fashion Week F/W19

Friday, March 22nd, 2019–Vancouver, BC–Friday night was a sensation, with a multitude of styles presented by designers hailing from Canada to New Zealand.

Local Vancouver designer Amy Herndon from IZATION STUDIO presented her visionary collection [Popularity Contest], which aims to expose and break down societal norms. Herndon’s line embodies this idea through its experimental composition, technical approach, and urban streetwear influence. The unisex garments transcended gender roles as male models donned the runway wearing ankle-length skirts and females wore baggy hoodies, dark makeup was worn by both. Fabrics that were interlaced with unconventional zippers and quotes like: ”we don’t clique” and “conformation”. Herndon intertwines function and form, combining soft textures and layers to create clean-cuts and boxy, relaxed shapes in hooded sweaters and loose-fitting pants. Most notable was a bright yellow floor-length puffer jacket paired with cobalt blue baggy trousers.

Ay Lelum-The House of Good Design, a line crafted byB.C. based sisters Aunalee and Sophia, presented their enchanting new collection, The K’wuyucun~Grizzly Bear. The sisters drew inspiration from Coast Salish culture and their family story originating from the ethereal GrizzlyBear, which was encapsulated in the pieces by the incorporation of intergenerational Coast Salish art. Garments featured nature-inspired colours, with shades of sage, turquoise and muted yellows, all infused with calming neutral tones. Floor-length column dresses of silky, metallic fabrics danced on the runway, alluding to an image of a flowing river while velvet top sand jackets lined with fur seemed to mimic a bear’s delicate coat. Also featured were draping shawls and hooded capes with embroidered intricate Coast Salish designs. Their showcase of wearable Indigenous art garments was a modern day storytelling of ancient traditions which left the audience in awe.

Emelia’s Swimwear, a Canadian brand by Emelie Hausler, transported the audience to a tropical holiday through their collection of luxury swimwear. Energetic and playful models worked the runway wearing flirtatious bikinis, interacting with each other and taking the spontaneous selfie. Hausler draws colour inspiration from her travels, resulting in diverse shades ranging from earthy tones to vibrant and bright hues which caught the eyes of the audience. The reversible swimwear was interlaced with modest mesh inserts, playful zipper sand feminine belts and braids, keeping each piece a balance between functional and stylish.The show finished with a dazzling finale as the models strutted down the runway for the last time collectively in head-turning bright fuchsia pieces.

The first of a presentation by Apparel Magazine, Bradley Smit’s collection personified the discolouration of glaciers. Through fabric, he imitated nature, starting with soft whites and blues that progress to increasingly darker silhouettes. The collection by the New Zealand based designer featured an array of gowns, floating blouses, and wide pant jumpsuits highlighted by hand-dyed elements of blue. While Smit channelled the ocean, Wairata presented wonderfully floral silk details that decorated dresses reminiscent of 1920s flapper girls, modernized with asymmetrical hemlines. The collection was wonderfully seductive with dresses that exposed the shoulders and included sequin details. The final collection presented by Apparel Magazine, from Aania, showcased a collection of tailored dresses, pants and tops exclusively in deep green, white and classic stripes. The show finale featured an exquisitely feminine, eye-grabbing silk dress.

Consulate General of the Republic of Indonesia presented a show that exposed the rich, diverse and beautiful fabrics to be found across Indonesia. NY by Novita Yunus offered three pieces that featured a royal, golden, traditional Indonesian pattern and a sweeping red sash juxtaposed with modern silhouettes in a blazer, v-neck dress, and A-line dress. Bernada communicated Indonesia's rich variety of fabrics through a line generous in material that expertly mixed and matched patterns. The items themselves, while often traditional tunics, vest and skirts, felt stylish and accessible with modern accessories and muted colours.

Faun, by Canadian designer Marisa P. Clark presented a wonderfully wearable collection this evening. A robustly feminine line featuring silk dresses, wide-legged pink pants and a suede jacket, the items stood apart due to a diverse colour palette of pink, teal, red, and blue. Clark added texture and dimension through details such as pearls, gold trim, gloves with fluffy cuffs and the brand’s signature antlers. The line looked sensual and flirty passing down the runway but would easily translate into any young woman’s office and social wardrobe.

HAMON, a Japanese brand created by Kumiko Iwano, showcased innovative and masterful craftsmanship through an extensive line exclusively made from fragments of fabric and materials left over from her last 10 years of production. ‘RE:incarnation’, a collection that spoke to the themes of memory and rebirth, started with a bright, eye-grabbing red dress and moved throughout a rich palette of black, grey and purple to conclude with beautiful white dresses.Most of the items featured one colour but added incredible texture through recycled fabric sewn upon the items in numerous ways, including raw and frayed strips, hemline tassels, patches and folds. Keeping the traditional Kimono silhouette of long jackets and robes with wide sleeves overlong pants or skirts, Iwano’s collection looked effortlessly elegant and, while innovative and creative, perfectly comfortable and wearable

Photos by Filippo Fior / Imaxtree.com

Day 4 at Vancouver Fashion Week F/W19

Thursday, March 21st, 2019 – Vancouver, BC – From gothic blacks to vibrant colours, Thursday was a night to remember with an eclectic mix of styles.

Thursday night kicked off with Taiwan-based Ming Design Studio by Ching-Ming Chen. Her latest collection, ‘Charm.2015,’ is defined by vibrant medleys of colour pieced together in a variety of silhouettes. From peplum skirts to militaristic coats, Ching-Ming has clothed the female form in every way possible. Evoking nostalgia through retro designs, Ching-Ming utilized subtle sheer and cotton fabrics highlighted with velvet accents. Ensembles were completed with natural makeup and white, black, or nude shoes. Many outfits were also paired with petite, brightly-coloured purses suspended at hemline level.

Next was GRANDI by designer Grandy of Vancouver. A returning designer, Grandy presented her bold, crayon-inspired collection entitled ‘Essential Colours’. All ensembles were monochrome, completed by small conical headpieces atop voluminous curled hairstyles. Glossy fitted jumpsuits and dresses in every colour of the rainbow were brought to life with the help of matching metallic lipstick and wide-brimmed shades. Grandy has splashed a collection of wonderfully elementary colours onto wardrobe staples.

Lisa Aviva, by US based designer Lisa A. Bleviss, commanded the runway with an intensely accessible yet modestly sensual collection. A size 10 + brand, Bleviss’ collection was a celebration of curves. It presented a selection of elongating dresses and skirts that floated down the runway in muted yet sophisticated colours of army green, camel, and blues. The collection offered fitted yet flattering pieces that did not hide but celebrated a fully figured form. The collection ended on a high with two knit, heel length, cinched at the waist ponchos in reddish pink and rust with dashes of blue, maroon and green. A true testament to careful, creative and innovative craftsmanship, Lisa Aviva made a line that not only looked good on plus sized women but, in fact, looked better on a full form than any size zero counterpart.

Mabu49, a New York based brand created by Ntokozo Fuzunina Kunene, celebrated the designer’s rich African heritage though inspired yet modern pieces. The ‘THAWASA’ collection, meaning Light of the New Moon in Zulu, was named after and inspired by the journey to becoming a traditional healer. While ancient in its inspiration, the collection was nevertheless relevant and youthful with a line of wide-legged, high waisted pants, triangular rompers, and long tunics paired with white sneakers. Simple in colour and deliberately wearable, the collection was nevertheless unique due to its innovative silhouettes, artistic cut-outs, and dramatic necklines.

Sorockolita, by Russian designer Viktoriya Stukalova, mastered the aesthetics of Gothic subculture to create a memorable collection that was simultaneously show stopping yet also featured incredibly wearable pieces. A fine craftswoman, Stukalova incorporated the name of her collection, ‘Black Wing’, into the items with fascinating yet subtle accents such as leather cut outs on blazers that resembled a feathered wing or soft Luneville embroidery. Transporting the audience to the dawn of Gothic culture, the Victorian period, the collection brought back the corset, bodice and ruffled neck juxtaposed with skinny leather pants and stilettos to keep the looks modern and accessible. The collection was exclusively black and white yet nevertheless textured through its mastery of multiple materials such as wool, leather, silk, and cotton. ‘Black Wing’ made Gothic fashionable, sexy, and powerful.

Australian designer Francesca Alexander presented CONTINUUM from her brand Frank & Virginia as the night drew on, making a statement with a collection defined by drape and layering with tight-to-figure profiles. Pieces were consistently marked by splashes of vibrant colour that brought an energy to the runway that would prove difficult to emulate. Long skirts and jumpsuits were long and flowing with asymmetrical cuts. Pockets, folds and belts added depth and functionality to the line, and several pieces near the end of the order added a provocative feel with sheer fabrics and tightly cut forms. CONTINUUM was well tailored, vigorous and sexy, and injected a jolt of energy into the Thursday night crowd.

Hometown designer and recent Blanche Macdonald graduate GEROME completed the evening with an electrifying show of streetwear-inspired looks for men and women. The collection featured a wide range of materials and influences- from ice white leather pants matched with fluorescent orange turtlenecks to oversized corduroy puffer jacket and matching brown pants. The soundtrack featured Vancouver-based rap group So Loki and was explosive and visceral, driving models to walk forcefully down the runway. Influences came directly from hip-hop culture with samples of 70’s cuts and futuristic concepts. Although the show was incredibly varied, it stayed true to GEROME’s sense of style, and he earned a standing ovation from the crowd as he danced with his models at the outset of the show.

Filippo Fior / Imaxtree.com

Day 3 at Vancouver Fashion Week F/W 19

Wednesday, March 20th, 2019 – Vancouver, BC – Wednesday was a night with a focus on Canadian designers, from BC to Ontario.

Eight designers from the Vancouver Community College’s Fashion Design & Production Diploma showcased their work to kick off Wednesday’s events. Collections ranged from 60’s inspired menswear to draping southeast Asian linen gowns and tech-focused garments in dark palettes. Each student brought a unique twist to their production, with engaging storylines and explosive soundtracks used throughout. Highlights included a scene straight from the dressing room with Astrid Shapiro, a cinematic display of power and rebirth from Sanaz Azad, and a royal inspired line from Mahnaz Gooya. The works reflected two years of hard work by the cohort, and a strong argument for engaging new fashion designers coming out of Vancouver.

The Atira Women’s Resource Society presented a collection from their EWMA (Enterprising Women Making Art) initiative, which supports women artists and artisans in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. The collection turned heads by beginning with multicoloured fur vest pieces and a long flowing aqua gown. Handcrafted accessories showcased the breadth of skills possessed by EWMA members, with various jewellery pieces and a floral and leopard-printed bandana adding depth to looks. Exquisitely woven knits completed a well-varied collection from hardworking artisans in the EWMA’s fourth consecutive year of being featured on the catwalk at Vancouver Fashion Week.

The Nöelziñia line crafted by Ontario based designer Noele Baptista was a striking collection of florals, gentle ruffles and heavy drapes. This rustic assortment was based on the idea of preserving beautiful memories, like flowers pressed between the pages of a treasured book, hence the collections name ‘Fleurs presses’. A violin played in the background while models with flower crowns worn on long, softly curled hair walked the runway in a dream-like trance. The clothing was ethereal and dreamy, the epitome of femininity. Flowers were elegantly pinned on the clothing, punctuating each thoughtfully placed ruffle. A few of the articles were gently frayed at the ends, giving an opulent bohemian feeling. Smooth silk and chiffon with hints of rich velvet created a stunning experience for the audience.

The Su Moda Collection, Ottawa’s first leading modest fashion brand, was created by mother and daughter duo Samra Mohamed & Fathia Mohamed, bringing a powerful eastern influence onto the catwalk. Poised models in long flowing blush tone garments sashayed down the runway to the beat of rich Arabic music. There were stiff materials with intricate golden embroidery merged with pastel tones of silk and linen, which were carefully selected from Dubai, Kuwait and New Delhi creating a beautiful canopy of gorgeous colour and lush fabrics. The models donned luxurious headpieces embellished in eye-catching stones and pearls, with only their eyes visible. Some of their robes were gently tied around their waist, the tassels swaying as they walked, other robes were left open, to flow fiercely behind them. The garments were modest yet eye-catching, creating a breathtaking flow of beautiful pieces of art

Rowes Fashion, a Canadian brand by Rebecca Rowe, showcased a cute and incredibly wearable collection. 'Solid Ground' opened with a short, plaid mini skirt partnered with a lacy, see-through top. It specialized in the pairing of unlikely patterns such as lace, plaid and dark florals throughout. A collection of skirts, cocktail dresses and casual jackets, the collection took simple silhouettes and made them stand-apart through the mix of patterns and small lace detailing on hems and sleeves.

Egyptian designer Nada Marzouk for Authentique transported the audience into an ancient world. 'Divine Adoratrice', inspired by the female-forward Egyptian Dynasty XVIII, fused a number of eye-grabbing details such as silver sequins, midnight sparkles, and graphics that depicted Egyptian architecture. Featuring a number of looks that ranged from day wear to shimmering evening wear, the collection also played with dimensions through juxtaposed hemlines. The line also featured a number of the brand's signature slippers. Despite being inspired by an ancient dynasty, the line was nevertheless accessible to the stylish, modern woman.

Soojinu, a label created by BC-based designer Soojin Woo, drew from Woo's rich Korean heritage to create a unique collection that was inspired by Shamanism. The collection utilized the traditional Shaman colours of red, blue, yellow and green to create a moody and curious showcase. Featuring a range of male and female models, the collection transcended gender roles through placing male models in tight, almost mermaid silhouette skirts in addition to leotards crisscrossed with yellow sequin sashes. Using a variety of materials, such as leather, fur and denim, the beauty and depth of The East was brought to the VFW runway.

Gracing the runway for both the Atira Women’s Resource Society and Rowes Fashion shows, Kidist, an 18-year-old from Toronto, lived her dreams by modelling at Vancouver Fashion Week. Through the Make-A-Wish foundation, Kidist, who is living with an immune deficiency, was able to have her absolute one true wish, to be a fashion model, come true at Vancouver Fashion Week.

Photo credit: Filippo Fior / Imaxtree.com.

Day 2 at Vancouver Fashion Week F/W19

Tuesday, March 19th, 2019 – Vancouver, BC – Tuesday was a night to showcase unique and show stopping collections with experimental fabrics and plays on scale.

The second day of Vancouver Fashion Week opened with ‘Celestial’, a resort-wear collection by Melissa Yin of Mel Elegance. Melissa is Chinese-Canadian and brings a multicultural aesthetic and minimalist comfort to luxury resort-wear. Inspired by a summer spent in Alaska Delaney National Park, Melissa’s designs are defined by flowing silhouettes and warm floral patterns in silk and linen. The sounds and sights of Alaskan wildlife are reflected through colour and detail in a collection that transitions steadily from black and floral ruffles to white lace. Rounding out the tone of the show were floor-length dresses in soft pinks and bright reds. Thoroughly accessorized, outfits were completed with bright blue and pink straw beach bags.

Next was Tyler Alan Jacobs of the TAJ House of Talents. A member of the Squamish First Nation, Jacobs creates traditional Coast Salish wear integrated with modern fabrics and cuts. His collection moved through form-hugging black and gold pieces to flowing cape silhouettes in black and cherry. Looks were completed with ombre yellow-red face markings and berry-red lips. Tyler highlighted his work with traditional First Nations motifs beaded ornately on dresses and skirts. The show concluded in dramatic fashion, as the final model strode down the runway and untied her motif-accented red cape, approaching the cameras with the textile around her waist.

Much like last season, Profanity by LillzKillz lived up to its name. The scandalous collection by BC based, 21 year old designer featured a range of diverse models who descended on the runway in attire unlike anything else seen so far. Drawing from the fashion culture of extreme snow sports, items included park rat oversized hoodies juxtaposed with tight mini dresses that, on one occasion, exposed the entire back and backside of the model. LillzKillz maintained no regard for gender roles, placing models in a mix of different pieces. An electric palette of bright orange, yellow and a graphic design that harkened back to 90s snowboarding culture fought for attention with an array of opaque, puffy and stark white fur fabrics. The result was eccentric and, need we say it, profane.

Camilla & Castillo, a sexually charged line from Venezuelan designer Camilla Castillo, featured an array of fitted pieces that celebrated the forms and curves of the female figure. The collection played with geometric compositions through multi-level hems and crisscrossing linear designs. Metallic accessories, studs and careful cut-outs created a line that is multi-dimensional and contradictory. The overall effect was to turn simple silhouettes, such as the pencil skirt and crop top, into pieces that are sexy, statement, and runway ready.

The Radastyle collection, by Belarusian designer Tatsiana Sychova, was the epitome of timeless, beautiful elegance. 'Orbit of Time' utilized classic, flattering silhouettes in sensual fabrics that stood apart with a mastery of fine details. Stunning floating dresses in silk and satin glided down the runway abated by eye catching necklines, ruffled sleeves, detailed waistlines and hemlines generously cut on the bias. The collection was coherent, elegant, and modest all while being breathtakingly sensual.

Japanese designer Michiko Ueda presented her brand GLAZE KOHL’s second collection, which displayed Michiko’s 20 years of experience as the proprietor of a vintage shop in Osaka, Japan. This collection was inspired by the colour of Japanese spring, with Michiko showing a mastery of woollen and velvet material. The pieces suggested a refined persona while still retaining playfulness, using soft silhouettes and muted palettes. A cheerful and barefooted model underscored this message, leading attendees to break into applause for the well-tenured designer who should be well-watched for any further additions to her brand.

17-year-old Vancouver-based designer Ming Lim from CRAZYYABAI closed off Tuesday’s events with a memorable showing of her collection ‘Sophrosyne’ exploring the idea of self-peace. This work is said to have surfaced from a period of self-realization and growth in Ming’s life, and features avant-garde looks that grab the attention of the viewer and convey a captivating message about the designer. Fantasy imagery is consistent throughout the line. Transparent materials stitched next to flowing legwear leave the model equally concealed and revealed, suggesting a feeling of veiled confusion. A mural-like printed train with an image of a heart being held by a weeping figure closed out a truly provocative show by the remarkable young designer.

Opening Night at Vancouver Fashion Week F/W 19

Monday, March 18th, 2019 – Vancouver, BC – the Opening gala night was a night to highlight the local talents from Vancouver complemented with a few from further afield.

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OPENING REMARKS

Community Manager Sarah Murray kicks off the show

On the first night of FW19, attendees were privy to the Designer Preview. The sampling was fun and innovative with a range of designers on full display. From ethereal and feminine silhouettes, bold vibrant colours, and eye catching print and texture combinations, the Designer Preview had a bit of everything. With such varied pieces, intrigue and excitement were felt throughout the crowd with anticipation bubbling around collections yet to come throughout the week.

To kick off the night, La Salle celebrated their 10 year anniversary of showing at Vancouver Fashion Week, with three promising designers presenting collections in the theme of Taboo. Shaghayegh Tafreshi’s collection evoked striking geometric patterns, with the use of contrasting materials in lace and synthetic highlighting the intersection between Western and Persian design and her background in architecture. Venezuelan fashion designer Valentina Valor’s work was focused on gender fluidity, but more importantly confidence in the self with strong and provocative figures that inspire poise in the wearer through opaque materials and belted features. Prisco completed La Salle’s showing with another genderless collection that utilized flowing silhouettes with tones in a calming palette, while focusing on the use of natural fabrics.

Japanese designer Emi Jingu showed off the endless artistic possibilities of balloons with her collection ‘Unlimited’. Jingu pushes artistic boundaries as she effortlessly coordinates a metallic palette of grey, bronze and gold tones while intricately layering balloons of different dimensions in such a way to create elegant couture silhouettes. Jingu’s dresses featured peplum-styles, slim bodices, and flared skirts, highlighting her extraordinary talents. The eccentric garments were complemented with sleek hairstyles, glossy makeup with ashy tones, and stilettos to encompass the chic futuristic style.

YONFA, a collection from Japanese designer Kim Yonghwa, was the embodiment of accessible, comfortable elegance to end the evening. In her collection, Yonghwa played with dimensions, offering a range of oversized jackets, crisp calf-length white shirts and sweaters cut at unique yet flattering angles. Yonghwa’s commitment to basic materials, such as wool and cotton, worked in harmony with her flattering silhouettes and elementary palette of white, navy, black and tan, to create looks free from fuss that express comfort, elegance and accessible style.

For Vancouver, opening night was full of excitement and intricate pieces.

Photos by IMAXtree.

Q & A with fashion brand Margot

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MARGOT

Japanese Brand

MM: Can you introduce your brand and yourself in a few sentences?

Hana Imai, designer for Margot, is a Japanese model for A-Plus, a Japanese entertainment production company. She has appeared on various TV shows, magazines, and fashion show events, not only as a model, but also as a designer for MARK STYLER since 2013. After 5 years practicing as a designer, she will launch her own brand “Margot” this spring, March 1st, 2019.

“Margot” is a brand that empowers all women by supporting their inner beauty and self-love. Our aim is to bring out the hidden attractions and charm that every woman has.

Our first collection will be an all dress line-up which one can wear on a wide range of occasions, from casual days to formal events.

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 MM: What sparked your interest in fashion design?

When I was working as a Gal (a Japanese subculture) model, I found myself very interested in clothing and fashion culture and I found the confidence to start my own brand. I have a lot of experience that I have accumulated over the past 5 years working as a designer and it was time for me to put it to use to grow my personal brand.

 MM: Can you describe your creative process?

I believe that everyone has concerns or problems with their body and fashion so I wanted to help them by designing clothes. The reason I am designing a dress collection, is to simplify everyday outfits so women have more time to focus on their beauty and self-love.

 MM: Where do you find inspiration in your day-to-day life?

Social media is a big part of my life and it is a great way to research modern women’s needs and information. That is where I get most of my inspiration.

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 MM: What kind of questions do you ask yourself when you begin creating a collection?

What clothes do I want to wear myself? What clothes make me happy?

MM: How did you learn the business of fashion?

Through my background working with several designers.

MM: How do you find working as a designer in Japan? Has the culture/surroundings affected your design aesthetic? Do you feel connected to your home?

I am thankful and proud of myself for being able to work as a designer for the past years in the respectful Japanese culture. Giving hospitality to others is a big part of our culture, which I love. I want “Margot” to be the brand to help the empower women through the clothing we create.

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MM: What is your favourite part of being a designer? What drives you to design?

When I see the clothes I designed with love on people walking down the street or on social media, I feel excited and experience a happiness that I have never felt before.  

 MM: What is the inspiration behind your F/W19 collection to be showcased at Vancouver Fashion Week?

Our theme for this collection is women and everything they symbolize.

 MM: What is your favourite item from the new collection?

I don’t have a particular favourite because I put so much effort and love into every piece that I love them all! I can’t wait to show our new collection.

Thank you for telling us about your journey into fashion design. We can't wait to see Margot show at Vancouver Fashion Week for the F/W19 season.

Check out Margot on Instagram.

Global Fashion Image Library powered by artificial intelligence

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Fashion professionals can now share, create, showcase design and get inspiration from the smart image library for the international industry.

Over a million professionals use the FashionUnited network and can now find and share information among the vast database of fashion-themed images. Thanks to AI, the new LookBook automatically recognizes image content and adds appropriate tags which categorizes visuals seamlessly. This makes search and sharing quick and intuitive.

Numerous users have uploaded thousands of images over the last years and our target is set to have over 1 million images in the directory by the end of this year. Besides user generated content, a dedicated team is adding images from Fashion Musea and Fashion Institutes, to safeguard fashion history and inspire design future.

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Q & A with illustrator Karlie Rosin

We sat down with Illustrator Karlie Rosin to chat about her career in special effects, content creation, and fashion illustration. Karlie will be working with Vancouver Fashion Week for to create live illustrations of some of the most captivating designs!

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Karlie Rosin

Fashion Illustrator

MM: Hi Karlie, tell us a bit about yourself and your background as an Illustrator.

Hello!

To start off, I’m originally from Montreal, I now live in Vancouver, Canada. I’m trained in traditional art, illustration & design, as well as Matte Painting for the VFX Industry. I studied traditional art ever since my mom put me in classes after seeing me draw a recognizable Lisa Simpson at 4 years old. I continued these classes and also went to college to study Illustration & Design, and then to University in Computer Graphic Design for Visual Effects, specializing in matte painting & environment design. After art school, I became a freelance illustrator and worked on various types of creative projects, which I would do part time. Meanwhile, I also started my career as a digital matte painter in the visual effects industry. Since then, I’ve worked on blockbuster movies such as Godzilla 2, Justice League, The Mummy, and Suicide Squad to name a few.

This exciting career experience taught me to work quickly and under pressure, and learn the skills necessary to build a business. It helped me expand my ability to be versatile and blend traditional and digital mediums to create the best quality work. I currently work as a freelancer taking on commercial illustration and painting contracts, and once in a while I will still take on another movie contract to do matte painting as this is also a passion of mine!

MM: As an artist, what draws you to fashion illustration in particular?

I have always loved fashion and used to work as a makeup artist. I really enjoyed working on creative photoshoots and high fashion runway makeup. I think fashion illustration taps into the feminine side of my art and I really enjoy blending imagery of the body and fabrics with different silhouettes and fabric movement. I see myself as capturing the moment, kind of like a photographer, but with my own perception and my own creative flair added to it through illustration. It also reminds me of figure drawing which I absolutely love doing. So, live sketching at fashion shows really helps with focusing on the main shapes and gestures of the look. Starting with a sketch and absorbing the energy from the show (lights, crowd, music, etc) then, going home and creating a final rendered illustration from that creative energy is one of my favourite things to do.

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MM: What was it like - transitioning from working in special effects in film to starting your own business?

Starting your own business is always a challenge, but it’s very exciting! I’ve always worked freelance, so it felt natural to start my own business in Vancouver. The hard part was moving here and not knowing anyone- starting a whole new business from scratch and building up a reputation and clients here. I am still taking on visual effects contracts though because I am really passionate about my work and career as a matte painter. These are similar contracts to what I take on as a freelance illustrator but the main difference is that I have to do the work in-house because of the high security involved with blockbuster movies. I do appreciate having the flexibility of which contracts I chose to work on and the mix of going in an office and also working from home creates a good balance for me.

MM: What do you think it is about Vancouver that brings out the creative spirit for young entrepreneurs?

I think we live in such a beautiful city that everyone inevitably has their muse. For me, personally, it’s the mountains and the beach in the same place. All you have to do is look up to find inspiration. I am 100% inspired by the nature in Vancouver and I’m sure that this plays a huge role in bringing out creativity in the community.

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MM: What do you have planned for 2019? - We hear you're launching a creative agency!

The beauty of freelancing is that you never know what you will be taking on next! But I am definitely excited about this year. I’m currently working on a movie that will come out in September doing matte paintings, and I have a set of 48 fashion illustrations that will be licensed out to a greeting card company which is launching in spring!

And yes, I will be launching an Agency! I have noticed an incredibly high engagement rate when I use motion graphics in my images as well as for my clients and this is definitely a growing trend, along with illustrated content for digital marketing in general. Image Fatale Creative Agency will focus on creating mesmerizing content that differs from traditional photography. This will include illustrations, mixed media, photo manipulations and moving images. You can visit imagefataleagency.com or instagram @imagefataleagency for more info. Stay tuned!

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MM: Last but not least, what are you most looking forward to for this F/W19 season at VFW?

I can’t wait to see the talent on the runway this year! I am definitely excited to attend, do some live sketching as mentioned above, and create some of my own artwork from that inspiration. I love illustrating for Vancouver Fashion Week and can’t wait to be doing it again this season. Discovering new talented designers as well as meeting people in the industry is energizing and I am looking forward to all of it!

Thank you for telling us about your journey into fashion illustration. We can't wait to see your illustrations for the Vancouver Fashion Week F/W19 season and hear more about Image Fatale Agency!

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You can find Karlie on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter or on her website www.karlierosin.com.

Q & A with fashion brand Ming Studio

Designer Ming, graduated from the Beijing Institute of Fashion Design, with a degree in sewing. “Ming” was established and became an independent brand in 2015.

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MING STUDIO

Taiwan based fashion brand

MM: Can you introduce your brand and yourself in a few sentences?

I like to use a combination of simple and complex styles to create my designs. I am not afraid of the existing international clothing brands on the market because I believe I have created the best brand. I like to design and hand craft each piece of clothing so that it is original, innovative, and comfortable to wear. I want to be the Kusama Yayoi of the fashion world. While I may have seemed inconspicuous in the past, I am confident in my designs.

MM: What sparked your interest in fashion design?

When I was in high school, I liked Kusama Yayoi 's works of art and it inspired me to pursue art as a career. My family disapproved of me going into art and design so I ultimately chose fashion design. I began to learn how to draw, design and produce fashion pieces. Soon after that, designing clothes became my life!

MM: Can you describe your creative process?

I like to feel the material before drawing the design. The texture of it will sometimes bring me inspiration and I will visualize the design. Each process, from drafting to the final stage, is carefully crafted. Each design is different and has its own unique personal style.

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MM: Where do you find inspiration in your day-to-day life?

I like to seek inspiration in my daily life and emotions. I like to travel alone to places I want to go just to see if something will catch my eye. Every aspect of my creations is closely related to the connections between people and the emotions that arise from human interaction.

MM: What kind of questions do you ask yourself when you begin creating a collection?

Before I start designing a collection I ask myself , “What do I want to express with my collection?” “What message do I want to send across?”

MM: How did you learn the business of fashion?

Before I started designing, I didn't know what fashion design entailed since I was just an art student. Most of my experience was in drawing and calligraphy. In high school, I began to learn how to design clothes and accessories. I designed, made, and honed my craft and I found that I love designing clothes. In order to improve my skills, I left my comfort zone and moved to Beijing to study at the Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology (BIFT).  This gave me a much better understanding of the fashion industry. BIFT gave me the opportunity to learn more about fashion as well as inspired me to continue my love for designing.

MM: How do you find working as a designer in Taiwan? Has the culture/surroundings affected your design aesthetic? Do you feel connected to your home?

After being back from Beijing, I worked as a women's wear design assistant and I found that I didn’t enjoy working on design styles that I wouldn’t wear myself. I decided to quit my job to become an independent designer and create my own design and studio. It didn’t run as smoothly as I hoped. My family opposed the brand I had created, and expected me to become a civil servant. Being stubborn and not satisfied with the constraints of my parents, I continued to create my own brand.  When I returned to my hometown, I found that every place has its own culture and aesthetics. The many memories of my early childhood all deeply affect my designs.

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MM: What is your favourite part of being a designer? What drives you to design?

I like to draw my own designs and the freedom that brings.


MM: What is the inspiration behind your F/W19 collection to be showcased at Vancouver Fashion Week?

My inspiration comes from my childhood memories. My grandmother always likes to carry colourful bags and take me to the market to buy vegetables. She’ll go to the tangerine shop and buy me my favorite snack “Prince noodles”. I like the bright and transparent packaging of the “Prince Noodles” snacks. I grew up to know a simple and retro bag that we called “Eggplant bag”.  I want to put the color of the bag, material, and my favorite “Prince” face packaging color design into my clothing so that each piece of clothing is retro yet stylish, and nostalgic yet comfortable.

MM: What is your favourite piece from the new collection?

I like all the pieces from my collection. If I really had to pick one, I like the “Nostalgic Retro Tricolor” piece.

Check out MING Studio on Instagram: @ming_design_studio

Sustainability in fashion

In the fashion industry, innovation and increased production is a double edged sword. While it should objectively be a good thing, if production is handled irresponsibly, it can be devastating to the environment.

On one hand, it is exciting and refreshing to see so many creatives immerse themselves in the world of fashion design and the business of fashion. On the other however, there is an age old problem of unsustainable production and generation of waste. The fashion industry generates an astounding amount of waste a year and it wasn’t until recently that it showed signs of slowing down.

In recent years, sustainability has ceased to be a trend and has reached far beyond what used to be a niche. It has almost entirely been adapted into mainstream culture. It started as a way for brands to portray themselves and attract the attention of a market they were previously missing out on, the conscious consumer market. The conscious consumer is one that pays attention to their purchases and expects a brand’s values to align with their own. This is the reason why brands such as TenTree, which plants 10 trees for every item it sells, and CHNGE, which is rooted in ethical manufacturing and has strong societal messages, have become very successful, very quickly.

There are a few ways to be ‘sustainable’ in fashion. Ideally, a brand will cover all the bases and excel at sustainable manufacturing, ethical buying, and social responsibility. In other words, a brand will care about their people, their product, and everyone else.

1. Their people

A fashion brand will manufacture their products in one of two ways: overseas or in-house. Overseas manufacturing of course, means outsourcing to other countries which usually have very loosely worded, poorly regulated labour laws that allow wealthy western companies to exploit their population. To most, this wasn’t such a big problem since the argument was that in any case, individuals from developing countries were in need of jobs and this solved that problem. This of course, leaves out the entirety of the context in which both parties in this agreement operate. Developing countries are trying to do just that, develop and grow. It’s hard to do so when your job opportunities and salary are capped at minimum wage. Especially when for most developing countries, minimum wage is just a few dollars a day. To put this in perspective, in Canada, minimum wage is just below 14 dollars an hour and the average minimum wage job such as customer service representative is quite easy compared to the work that these individuals endure. Imagine working 10 hours in a factory with no air conditioning, little access to water, and absolutely no growth opportunities, for 3 dollars a day. 

A sustainable fashion brand, unlike every brand that falls under any of the manufacturing conditions mentioned above, cares about their people. Manufacturing can be sustainable in many ways but for the purpose of this blog post, i’ll refer to the social sustainability aspect of it. Sustainable manufacturing means, providing good working conditions, growth opportunities, and a reasonable salary to manufacturing workers. This is sustainable in the long run because in this case, everybody wins. The brand gets dedicated workers that are loyal to the business on the one end, and on the other, workers can enjoy a solid workplace. 

2. Their product

Most clothing companies will manufacture clothing with Polyester fabrics. The reason why this fabric is an all time favorite is that it is stretchy, comfortable, and durable. However, what doesn’t get mentioned very often is that Polyester is manufactured from crude oil and every time a piece of polyester fabric is washed, it releases plastic microfibres that contaminate our oceans. If you head to your favourite clothing store its pretty likely that you will see a percentage of Polyester on just about every item in store. So, what exactly can be done about this and how can we transition out of the excessive consumption of unsustainable fabrics?

From a companies stand point, they would need to transition to highly sustainable fabrics such as Linen which is made from fibres of the flax plant. Another option is to replace cotton with its organic alternative. Organic cotton eliminates the use of harmful chemicals and requires significantly smaller amounts of water to grow. A company can also invest time and money on garment technology but what has always proven to be a safe bet is recycling!

Brands like Ellen Fisher are innovative in their use of fabrics like cotton, wool, and cashmere that have been re-spun from old garments or cutting room scraps. Another example is Thought a UK brand that specializes in creating staples from fabrics like Ramie and Hemp.

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BIRDS EYE VIEW OF THE OCEAN

3. Everyone else

Second only to oil, the fashion industry is the largest polluter in the world which shouldn’t be too surprising. What might be however, is that nowadays, companies are hiding behind words like ‘sustainability’ or ‘recycling’ to appeal to a consumer market that would have previously considered them too wasteful or harmful to the environment. Ultimately, they end up ‘green washing’ their own brands. Similar to ‘social washing’, ‘green washing’ refers to when brands spend more time and money telling consumers they’re green, than actually implementing new policy. While actual tangible proof that a company is sustainable is necessary, one of the most important elements of sustainability is transparency. The conscious consumer appreciates honesty over everything else. This is why, when H&M introduced it #Reworkit campaign asking consumers to return their used clothing for it to be recycled, the brand was under heat when it was revealed that less than 0.1% of the clothing returned is actually #reworked. While it is understandable that not all fabric can be pulled apart and re-spun, it doesn’t follow their promise of creating a closed loop system.

The issue with these campaigns is that they overpromise and underdeliver. Especially if they are created by an industry giant like H&M. Since they produce such staggering amounts of clothing every day, a recycling initiative is not what the conscious consumer expects to see.

We live in a time when thankfully, sustainability hasn’t been seen as a choice for a long time. Consumers now expect a brand to care about their impact on the world and companies are listening. Smaller, up and coming brands almost have no choice but to make their view on the environment very clear from the start.

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SUNCUN Presented by Global Fashion Collective

A smoky runway set the stage for Chinese brand SUNCUN, creating an ethereal, dreamlike atmosphere. Adults and children modelled the new collection ‘FUSHENG’, with dragon motifs, metallic embroidery, and mandarin collars evoking a sense of the East. Wavy wisps of hair artfully framed the face and lips were painted a ‘lucky’ red colour.

Designer Yan Zhang integrated cultural elements with contemporary styling for FW19 using distinctive traditional features such as ornamental braiding, Chinese frog fastenings and Cheongsam silhouettes.

Smiling children clad in silk slippers brought the collection to life, illustrating the lively and carefree aspects of childhood that have inspired Zhang this season. Boy’s looks featured tunics paired with silk pants and regal robes. Girls were fitted in whimsical gowns with soft flowing trains, shimmering fabrics, and ornate embellishments that glimmered in the light.

Tulles with delicate hand beading and intricately embroidered appliqué showcased the incredible artisanal techniques of SUNCUN.

The colour palette developed from inky blacks through to pastel pink and sage green, before flourishing into brilliant whites. Zhang offered a fresh perspective on womenswear with a striking black and white contrast dress featuring beaded bamboo designs.

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A young boy named King Singh walked the runway in a tailored two-piece featuring a bird motif, known as a strong symbol of good luck. King came to SUNCUN through the organization A Free Bird; a non-profit that provides children diagnosed with cancer a chance to explore their artistic passion.

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The finale featured a duet of traditional male Changshan tunics and robes, both crafted in lavish gold silk; a masterful ending to a dramatic showcase representing SUNCUN’s dedication to bringing Chinese culture and fashion together.

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About Global Fashion Collective (GFC)

Global Fashion Collective is a platform supporting creative designers from all around the world. The collective produces runway showcases in different fashion capitals with the aim to accelerate the designer’s global development, increase their international media visibility, and open new markets. By presenting its designers in front of international media and buyers globally, Global Fashion Collective is an expansion of Vancouver Fashion Week.

Check out SUNCUN on instagram.

Interview with Spanish Couture House Yolancris

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Yolancris

Spanish Haute Couture Brand

Fashion brand Yolancris originated in Barcelona in 2005 and has since grown significantly. In 2008, this fashion house debuted in the Gaudí runway shows in Barcelona and eleven years later they brought their Spring-Summer 2019 ‘Opera Prima’ collection to Paris. Since then, Yolancris has created a big name for itself, and has been showcased by many influential celebrities and artists such as Beyoncé and Lady Gaga.

The Yolancris show during Paris Haute Couture Fashion Week took place in a beautiful and ornate 18th century building; the Hôtel Le Marois- France Ameriques. We interviewed Yolanda Perez, designer and creative director for Yolancris, to find out more about the inspiration for this jaw-dropping collection and successful brand!

How was your Haute Couture Fashion Week experience?

Overall it was a very positive experience but certainly a test because of the pressure of competing on a platform with huge names like Jean Paul Gaultier, Viktor & Rolf or Zuhair Murad. But the experience has been very good and we are very happy.

This was Yolancris’ first show in Paris. What did this mean to you?

As a designer, doing a fashion show in Paris is always a dream come true. I admire classic creators and artists such as Balenciaga, Christian Dior, and Valentino. To be closer to them in any way is always an honour and an opportunity to learn.

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What was it like growing up with a mother in the fashion and bridal business? How has it influenced the creation of your brand?

Our mother was head of production for bridal companies for many years and eventually opened her first store in 1985. From the young age of 7, my sister Cristina and I, would spend our time after school collecting needles at my mother’s store. We owe everything to her. She now works for the company and at 68 years of age, never missed a day!

What is it like working in the fashion business together as sisters?

We get along very well. I am the creative director and designer and my sister is in charge of the economic and commercial part of the business so our jobs do not interfere. We have a lot of faith and trust in each other’s work.

As two successful business women in the modern age, what is your advice for aspiring women designers?

I would advise them to learn a job, a craft. Paying for expensive bachelor and graduate degrees is one way to gain experience but it is not essential to dedicate yourself to fashion. You have to learn by doing.

"Walker, there is no path, the path is made by walking”

“Caminante, no hay camino, se hace camino al andar”

- Antonio Machado.

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What does the word ‘craftsmanship’ mean to you in regard to your collection?

It is present in everything we do. We do not design digitally or sketch. We assemble each and every one of the pieces on a mannequin. We are guided by intuition and trial and error. Craftsmanship and proximity are some of the most important values of the brand which we believe translate into our designs. Many of them could not be mass produced. All of our production is made in-house in our workshop in Barcelona since all of the materials and fabrics are bought locally.

What separates this collection from your previous work?

This SS19 Couture collection differs from the others in that I've let explore freely and create without constraints more so than in my other collections.

Barcelona was an inspiration for this collection. In what ways does the influence of a location play an important role when designing a collection?

Everything that surrounds you inspires you. The place where you live certainly does and Barcelona is such a special city that it naturally happened that way. Art is very present in my collections: Art Nouveau, pre-Raphaelites, Surrealism, the light of Sorolla and so on.

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The show took place in the Hôtel Le Marois- France Ameriques. How did you choose the location?

I saw it in a fashion show of a German brand and it was love at first sight.

The last Spanish designer to attend Haute Couture Fashion Week was in 2009. What is it like to be important Spanish designers at this time?

It's a big step. With everything being so ephemeral nowadays, you need to relativize. There’s work to do the next day.

How do you want your customer to feel when wearing your dresses?

I want her to feel powerful, elegant, and sophisticated. Most importantly, I want her to feel empowered. Femininity is a very subjective concept, but femininity as I understand it, is one of the pillars of my designs.

What are your future hopes and goals for Yolancris?

I started working when I was 16, so I would like to slow down a bit at some point in order to be able to combine work and family. For the time being, we want to keep doing as many new things as possible.

Your dresses have been worn by many influential people. How important is it while growing a brand to have celebrity clients?

Dressing celebrities gives you a lot of notoriety and it is always an honour that the best and most famous singers on the planet wear your clothes. However, we do not prioritise celebrities over any other client. It is as important to us to dress Beyoncé or Lady Gaga as it is to dress any anonymous client. The same effort and love is put into their designs.

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At what point as designers did you feel you had become a successful brand?

I don’t think you're ever aware of exactly when you're at the top. You feel it, but in a way that makes it hard to grasp. We intend to continue growing and working on Yolancris.

Thank you for telling us about your journey and continuing to inspire young designers!

Check out the website here: Yolancris.

Written by: Abby Droeger & Jessica Haltrecht

Q & A with fashion brand YONFA

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YONFA

Japanese fashion brand

MM: Can you introduce your brand and yourself in a few sentences?

I was born and raised in Japan by Korean immigrants. My diverse cultural background led me to develop a strong sense of Japanese fashion and an appreciation for Korean production methods. It has been three years since I established my own brand, YONFA, in 2016. YONFA’s target consumers are mature women who love fashion and are open to trying new things and changing their everyday style.

MM: What sparked your interest in fashion design?

Like any designer, it started with wanting to make clothes that I love. I have loved fashion since I was a little girl. Growing up, I began experimenting with fashion and mixing pieces from fast fashion brands and luxury brands to create my own style.

One thing I always wished I could find was a brand that was affordable but that had the qualities of a luxury brand. One that would inspire confidence in women. Now that I’m designing my own clothes, this desire for affordable confidence inspires my creations. I hope my brand will be a breath of fresh air in the fashion industry!

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MM: Can you describe your creative process?

The most important thing while I am designing, is to think about what kind of clothes I would personally want to wear. Mature women do not like clothes unless they fit them well, can be used in different ways, and are durable. I always think of their needs first and after that, find a balance between casualness and quality.

MM: Where do you find inspiration in your day-to-day life?

I get most of my inspiration from day to day occurrences such as looking up the sky when I wake up, eating meals, and seeing art in museums or listening to music.

MM: What kind of questions do you ask yourself when you begin creating a collection?

What would I want to wear? What kinds of materials would I want to have? What colours would I like to see? I consider my own taste while I design.

MM: How did you learn the business of fashion?

From my previous job at a clothing store, I learned customer service, visual merchandising, operations, and how to train staff. After that, I went back to school as a fashion business major and gained even more knowledge.

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MM: How do you find working as a designer in Japan? Has the culture/surroundings affected your design aesthetic? Do you feel connected to your home?

I am very proud to be one of the many fashion designers in the world. In Japan especially, the standard for fashion is high so it is truly an honour. I also think the use of social networks has been a huge impact for me and expanded the reach of my brand.

MM: What is your favourite part of being a designer? What drives you to design?

My favourite part is when I put all of my ideas together and get positive feedback from customers. They love my collections and that motivates me!

Thank you for telling us about your journey into fashion design. We can't wait to see YONFA show at Vancouver Fashion Week for the F/W19 season.

Check out YONFA at: YONFA

The New Meaning of 'Made in China' - 2025

In 2015 Chinese President Xi Jinping announced a new ten-year economic plan called ‘Made in China 2025’. This plan is modelled, in-part, after Germany’s Industry 4.0 plan and is focused mainly on technology and robotics. A wider part of this initiative is the rebranding of Chinese industries from imitators to innovators. What does this have to do with the fashion industry? Well, it’s news to no one that China is infamous for their knock-offs. Simply search Beijing’s ‘Pearl Market’ and you’ll find hundreds of Youtube videos dedicated to finding and bartering for the best designer knock-offs China has to offer.

That reality has been shifting in China over the last ten years. There is a new generation of designers creating clothing for the insatiable and growing Chinese market. Initiatives like this one, which are only tangentially related to the fashion industry, help the global perception of China’s fashion goods shift from low quality clothes and high quality knock-offs to China as a new creative fashion hub. China’s designer fashion market is a Blue Ocean ready for fresh talent to wow the awaiting consumer.

As China’s fashion industry grows, the West can take note. China’s lateral movement into the open world allows for innovation not tethered to current practices or traditions. Chinese talent who in past have moved west to practice their skills are now staying in the mainland and flourishing in hubs like Shenzhen and Shanghai. These Creatives are starting their own labels and magazines. They’re designing for a Chinese consumer base that is ready to embrace and curate niche brands and smaller designers.

New projects like Rouge Fashion Book (a bi-annual coffee table fashion book) and established fashion houses like EPO Fashion Group (Home to Mo&CO and Edition) alike are able to find a home in southern China. Companies like EPO have been around for over a decade, but they’re recently getting the recognition they deserve. They play an important part in the rebranding China as a place for creativity and innovation. 

In addition to designers, Chinese editors and influencers are also making a stand in defense of Chinese creation. Leaf Greener a former editor for Elle China and founder of a WeChat based magazine, LEAF is among many whose work displays China as a place of creativity not just consumerism. As she covers fashion weeks around the world, she continues to defend China among them as a cutting edge player in the fashion world. 

We’re almost to the halfway mark of Made in China 2025 and what do we have to show for it? I can’t speak on robotic technologies, but we can see the fashion insiders of the West paying more mind to the rising giant in the East. More and more western publications are covering events like Shanghai Fashion Week. The Business of Fashion dedicated almost nine pages of their 2018 State of Fashion (only a 45 pg. document) to addressing China and the overall Asian market. The public won’t be far behind these insiders as they realize their favourite brands are not only being made in china, but also designed in China. 

Indeed, China based brands continue to grow in popularity both in China and in the West. Additionally, as events like Shanghai Fashion Week continue to grow and gain global attention, so will other Chinese designers and labels. Personally, I look forward to watching as the Chinese creative community shows the world what this part of the East has to offer. Enriching their designs with Chinese culture and tradition juxtaposed with a fresh perspective that remains unbound to the lines the West has been drawing within for the past hundred years. 


A day is coming when ‘Made in China’ will mean something much different than it does in the west today, and that day is coming soon. 

Q & A with Fashion Brand HAMON

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HAMON

Japanese fashion brand

MM: Can you introduce your brand and yourself in a few sentences?

The impressed feeling reverberates. Like a drop of water falling on the water will continue to expand with a beautiful arc. Both inside and outside.

MM: What sparked your interest in fashion design?

I felt interested because fashion reflects the spirituality of a person.

MM: Can you describe your creative process?

I visualize various conscious thoughts and emotions that I feel on a daily basis and I turn them into clothes.

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MM: Where do you find inspiration in your day-to-day life?

I find inspiration within myself. I am constantly trying to see things from a different perspective.

MM: What kind of questions do you ask yourself when you begin creating a collection?

Questions of individuality and diversity. Thoughts and emotions come from the same place. Don’t they? View yourself from different points of view. Lastly, do I have to make it or do I want to make it?

MM: How did you learn the business of fashion?

I am learning from various individuals I have met through my work. Everyone gives me advice and shares their opinion from their point of view. I am really interested in hearing everyone else’s perspective.

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MM: How do you find working as a designer in Japan? Has the culture/surroundings affected your design aesthetic? Do you feel connected to your home?

I started making clothes by myself. As most people know, Japan has a very unique culture. I design without intention. I think that overthinking the design process interferes with creativity. Through clothes, I connect with different individuals in society.

MM: What is your favourite part of being a designer? What drives you to design?

Being able to bring an idea to life.

MM: What is the inspiration behind your F/W19 collection to be showcased at Vancouver Fashion Week?

Regeneration. The leftover fabric after making clothes, fragments of woven fabric being repurposed. This collection celebrates accidents and the inevitability of life by focusing on the power of your mind to create.

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MM: What is your favourite piece from the new collection?

The Two Sided Dress (pictured above).

Thank you for telling us about your journey into fashion design. We can't wait to see HAMON show at Vancouver Fashion Week for the F/W19 season.

Check out HAMON at: HAMON Clothes

Q & A with Fashion Brand Emelia's Swimwear

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Emelia’s Swimwear

Toronto based fashion brand

MM: Can you introduce your brand and yourself in a few sentences?

I’ve always considered myself to be a ‘Follower of Sunshine™’, and the Followers of Sunshine™ are who I create my swimwear for. My brand focuses on quality, comfort, function, and of course, style with an emphasis on environmental stewardship. 

MM: What sparked your interest in fashion design?

I was travelling to many beach destinations and I found that there was a lack of  high quality, functional, and cute swimwear. I wanted to create a bathing suit that would be all of these things and also last for many swimwear seasons to come. 

MM: Can you describe your creative process?

My creative process is always different.  I am continuously asking other women and men what they would like to see or have in a swimsuit. 

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MM: What kind of questions do you ask yourself when you begin creating a collection?

What makes one feel beautiful? What makes one feel confident? What’s going to make others turn their head when they see someone in Emelie’s Swimwear? What activities is one going to want to do while in swimwear? 

MM: How did you learn the business of fashion?

I am self taught and studied other designers and felt that many aspects of the bathing suit could be approved upon without sacrificing cost. 

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MM: How do you find working as a designer in Canada? Has the culture/surroundings affected your design aesthetic? Do you feel connected to your home?

In Ontario our summers are short but the time is well spent with outdoor activities and soaking up as much sun as possible. I take this into consideration when designing swimwear as I want my pieces to be practical and functional for the many summer actives but I also want them to be comfortable and stylish. I live in Wasaga Beach, Ontario, I truly love it and feel very much connected to my home. However, as a Follower of Sunshine™, I find a little bit of ‘home’ wherever I travel. 

MM: What is your favourite part of being a designer? What drives you to design?

My favourite part of being a designer is the satisfying feeling of seeing women in my swimwear and seeing how their inner confidence and beauty truly shines. Helping make women look and feel good is what drives me. 

MM: What is the inspiration behind your F/W19 collection to be showcased at Vancouver Fashion Week?

Health and wellness has become a big part of today’s society and is my inspiration for my F/W19 collection. Introducing daring reds and confident blues represents the attitude behind the new collection. 

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MM: What is your favourite piece from the new collection?

If I had to pick just one, I would say my new ‘Marcella’ mesh onesie. The back detailing is so flattering and is very beautiful. 

Thank you for telling us about your journey into fashion design. We can't wait to see Emelia’s Swimwear show at Vancouver Fashion Week for the F/W19 season.

Check out Emelia’s Swimwear at: emeliasswimwear.com

Style Chronicles: Tara Monfared

My name is Tara Monfared from the IG account @styledbytara.m

My blog and IG channel started as a creative outlet during my career working in finance for the Federal Government of Canada. I always dreamed of working in the fashion industry since it has always been my biggest passion, but living in Ottawa, Canada my options were limited which is why I decided to take it online. StyledbyTara has since grown into a visual diary where you will find a collection of style inspiration, life experiences, travel adventures, and beauty tips.

Fashion has always been an important part of my life. It has accompanied me since a young age and has shaped my life. I believe fashion is a statement. It’s versatility enables you to express yourself in who you are.

I believe personal style evolves as you learn who you are, what you want, and what you love and much like my blog, my style has evolved a great deal over the years.

Although I’ve always leaned towards the trendy side of things, I still try to keep it timeless. I rock trends like fanny packs and chain belts but use them to compliment an outfit rather than making the pieces the main attraction. I love mixing modern embellishments with classic items.

As much as I love my city, I have to admit fashion is not most people’s priority here so I have always found inspiration through other means like travel, social media, and good old fashion magazines. I spend a few months of the year in Europe which is where I find most of my inspiration. I love street style fashion the most and I always get inspired by the diversity of people’s style and in turn this influences me to unleash my creativity and have fun with fashion rather than to tame my style solely because of the conservative style of my city. I feel content dressing the way I feel best even if some of the items I wear may be ‘too trendy’ for where I live.

Thank you Tara for giving us an insight into your style! Readers follow Tara at @styledbytara.m.

@helananas on Fashion, Ambition, and the Power of Colour

London-born Visual artist Helen Anna is highly sought after for her aesthetic and knack for storytelling.  Helen has a postgraduate in design and has also studied language, silversmithing and textile design. As a freelance creative in Vancouver, Helen’s fashion clients span everything from backpacks to bridal couture. We sat down with Helen on the front row of VFW to talk Vancouver fashion and style icons, and to dig deeper into Helen’s fascination with the power of colour.

What are the cons of freelance?

You have to be really motivated and you have to be really driven.  Time management can be a problem - not for me, but I know people that have struggled with it.  You also can’t be shy - you have to be ready to put yourself out there and tell people what you do and show them that you believe in yourself to convince them to put their dollars behind you.  Overall, though, there are very few cons - it’s mostly a lot of pros!

What are the pros of freelance?

The biggest pro for me is being able to work whenever I want.  Creativity ebbs and flows, and as a freelancer, you can work within your rhythm, and take time out when you’re not feeling so creative. It’s great to be able to fit my work around my life, rather than vice versa!

Another pro is that you get to learn about your clients and their industries. Not learning anything new had been a challenge for me in my corporate past life, so I really appreciate the opportunities I get now to keep expanding my knowledge.  

How would you describe your personal style?

It’s a bit of an eclectic mix.  I do love designer brands - which would be something I would have never said even five years ago. As I’ve gotten older and been able to afford labels a bit more often, I’ve just realized the quality is just so much better.  If you compare it with fast fashion, one will be in the trash in six months, and one will still be loved for many years to come. I also think the way you treat your clothing changes when you’re investing a little more in it - it becomes a precious object.

What inspires your style?

I find I admire women from the past!  Jackie O, Audrey Hepburn, Francoise Hardy - if you look at their outfits, and the look is still good today,  that’s a good sign that that silhouette is on point.

What’s your favourite decade?

If I had to choose it would be the 60s.  There was also a lot going on socially and that turbulence showed up in fashion. Social trends materialise into fashion years later - the hippieness of the 60s really materialised into fashion in the 70s!

Who is your biggest style icon?

If I’m in a rut, the first person I’ll look up is probably Alexa Chung.  She’s really beautiful and her care-free attitude comes through in her clothing.  She’s very magnetic and charismatic, and I love that.

What is it about colours that interests you so much?

I remember in my first year of design school they wouldn’t let us touch colour at all - everything was black and white in order to learn the basics of design, form, and shape.  I remember complaining to one of the older students that I wanted to get my hands on colour and he turned around and clapped back ‘you’re not ready for colour yet.’ That comment always stuck with me because at the time I remember thinking: ‘buddy, you don’t know how wrong you are. I’m SO ready for colour.

I run a colour series on Instagram where I ask the same question (what does this colour make you think of?) to hear how people respond to different colours.  It’s always so interesting. Someone might answer that it makes them feel ‘bored’ and someone else might say ‘it reminds me of a stormy day at my grandma’s house.’  People can have such different interpretations.

Have you noticed any patterns in people’s answers?

There are certain colours that are so ubiquitous.  If I post a colour that is used by a brand, for example, people will always comment that it made them think of the brand.  One thing that’s surprising to me is that when I post a new colour I always have a very clear idea in my mind of what that colour is and means, but no one has ever said my answer ever.  It just goes to show how subjective the whole thing is.

What is your favourite colour?

I really love International Klein blue.  It’s close to the colour that Matisse used in his blue nudes.

What is the most positive response you’ve gotten to a colour?

I get a lot of positive responses to that sunflower-y kind of yellow.  People share lots of childhood memories with that colour. It always amazes me how personal people will get when I ask what a colour makes them think of.

What do you think will be a big trend this year?

There’s an accountability in fashion now that we didn’t feel even just a few years ago.  I remember working in fashion a decade ago, and sustainability and eco fashion was kind of like this niche pocket that felt a bit granola-y, whereas now its more of a mainstay: more consumers are asking “where is this piece coming from”?  I believe the more we as consumers ask those questions to designers and brands, the more that question is attended to by their shareholders, and the more it is taken seriously. We have to find resourceful, healthy ways to produce our clothing that is going to benefit the planet and benefit people - and still look bomb as well!

Thank you Helen for giving us an insight into your world. Readers- take a look at Helen’s beautifully curated Instagram here.