Q & A with Fashion Designer Erin Clare Bridal

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MM: Can you introduce your brand and yourself in a few sentences?

Erin Clare Bridal operates out of our studio on the beautiful Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia. Erin Clare designs celebrate the feminine, featuring exquisite fabrics, textures and attention to detail. They are created by our handpicked team of ateliers. Our gowns are highly sought after and distributed throughout Australia and to brides around the world. Each dress is a work of art.

MM: Can you describe your creative process?

Creating new gowns is always really exciting for me. I usually start with the feeling I am wanting to convey. It is all about drape, texture, and detail when selecting fabrics. Once selected then the fun really begins. I love challenging myself and asking the question: “how can this be better?”.
Sometimes I really fall in love with a fabric first and design around how I feel the fabric would work best. The design evolves spontaneously. A combination of thoughts, feelings and experience. Developing a concept drawing to a pattern which evolves into a beautiful gown is incredibly rewarding. it's like bringing a dream into reality.

MM: Where do you find inspiration in your day-to-day life?

I am inspired by movement and the celebration of the female form. Bringing a dream to life gives me immense joy.


MM: What kind of questions do you ask yourself when you begin creating a collection?

I continually ask myself: “How can I improve on this idea?”.


MM: How has your work evolved since you began your own label?

I have become more confident in exploring a variety of fabrics and construction techniques that break with traditional bridal norms.


MM: How do you find working as a designer in Australia? Has the culture/surroundings affected your design aesthetic? Do you feel connected to your home?

We live in a beautiful country with pristine beaches and an immense sense of freedom. We live a refined yet relaxed lifestyle. I think this flows through our design aesthetic.


MM: What sparked your interest in fashion design?

My incredible Granny “Joan” ignited the first spark. As a small child, I would play with her fabric offcuts. My mum taught me to knit and crochet and they both encouraged me to do sewing classes. As a teen, I would create clothes for myself and my friends.

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MM: How did you learn the business of fashion?

Creative drawing has always been a way of expressing my ideas. I had the constant frustration of following bought patterns and not being able to make what I imagined. When I went to study Fashion Design and learned the incredible art of pattern making, I was like a bird set free. Learning to manipulate fabrics and create exactly what I saw in my head was life- changing.

MM: What is your favourite part of being a designer? What drives you to design?

Meeting so many different women from so many walks of life and the joy of creating their wedding gown is an incredible honour. I love bringing dreams and ideas into reality.


MM: What is the inspiration behind your S/S19 collection to be showcased at Vancouver Fashion Week?

Our collection is a celebration of the female form using movement and light.

Find Erin on Instagram here or on her website here.

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AMBER JAE SLOOTEN & THE FABRICANT: COMBINING FASHION DESIGN WITH MACHINE LEARNING

AN EXPLORATION IN CREATIVE COEXISTENCE

For our new theme 'Pioneer', we talk to Digital Fashion Designer Amber Jae Slooten about her recent project with The Fabricant.

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You identify as a Digital Fashion Designer, can you tell us about the work you create?

I call myself Digital Fashion Designer because I design clothes, but I haven't actually touched any fabric in years. With the latest 3D technology that has been developing within the past few years it is now possible to simulate garments before ever actually creating them in real life. I work in a digital space with endless materials and possibilities, and if I don't like my design I just hit ctrl+z. It's a new way of working which, I think, will be the future of the industry, as it eliminates excessive sample production and takes us to a new way of working. In my work I also discover the possibilities of the digital world. What will we look like when we enter a VR space? What will we look like in 10 years with the digitization going at the speed it does now? Will we even still be wearing physical clothes or could we wear holograms? The past years I have been trying to form an answer to those questions by creating installations of digital garment animations. 

How did you find yourself creating this type of work?

During my studies I realized that I did not want to work in a fashion industry that was so polluting. I came across the 3D animation software during a minor outside of my studies and ever since then I have completely fallen in love with it. When I brought it back to school and told my teachers I wanted to graduate with digital garments they told me I was crazy. And yet here I stand, graduated with 8 virtual outfits, having showed my digital garments at Amsterdam Fashion Week back in 2016 and still producing many new outfits without them ever existing in real life.

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...if I don’t like my design I just hit ctrl+z.

Can you introduce your project to the MM readers?

What will be left of our dreams after computers learn to dream? Venturing into unknown territory, "DEEP" project explores the Wild West, combining fashion design with automated exploration. What resulted is a collaboration between human creativity (my brain) and machine learning (the computer). The computer's 'dreamed-up images' serve as inspiration for my latest 3D digitally crafted collection. They predicted shape, colour and texture and I used these as a big inspiration point. It made us think about what the digital revolution could ultimately mean for fashion design, the industry, and the very people working in it.

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The collection is made entirely on the computer, in collaboration with The Fabricant, which resulted in a hypnotising animated video presentation taking the viewer through endless digital environments. Remnants of the fashion industry float through the scenes as the avatar moves forward into places that are vaguely familiar but estranging too. Can an algorithmic process of trial and error lead to creativity?

Where did you take inspiration for this project?

Basically the algorithm inspired me to create these shapes, and use these colours. The images it created were so inspiring to me that I wanted to create outfits from it. By myself I wouldn't have come up with these shapes, which is a whole different approach to design using the computer to my benefit. I still needed to create 3D garments from a vague 2D picture so I used elements of western historical clothing to express the feeling of moving into this Wild West, this digital undiscovered world. This project combines virtual animations and real elements and pushes them to a hyper-real level that leaves the viewer in a weird state, not knowing what real and what is fake. The name DEEP comes from deep learning, the artificial intelligence technology we used that is able to create 'fake' objects without them ever existing in real life by using reference pictures. 

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Did the computer have specific inspiration points for the collection, in terms of fabrics/colours etc? Or was it random?

We gave the algorithm input of a large dataset of pictures of Paris Fashion Week. The algorithm does not know what it is looking at, as in it does not know that it is clothing. It generates random pixels to try and recreate the images we gave it, but without seeing them. In this way the computer is able to come up with images that are generated by constantly learning whether it is on the right track and the images that come out are vague representations of garments that from a distance look like catwalk pictures. I gave it meaning by choosing the fabrics and actually designing the garments, with the computer image as my reference. 

How did you take the computer's images into a new dimension?

As the image comes out in 2D, it looks like a vague representation of a garment, but it is nowhere near an actual piece of cloth or a pattern. What I do as a designer is taking inspiration from silhouette and colour that I translate with my own inspiration elements into outfits. I sculpted the outfits on the computer and the result was this collection- designed by the computer and by me. To me it is also super interesting to see where the computer ends and I take over, how much do I stick to what it predicted in the shape, how much of the image do I recreate? There is still very much a creative vision needed to keep the collection consistent.

Your 3D visualisation videos are very mesmerising, I could watch them all day. Can you define the qualities that make it so?

We call it hyper-realism. An added layer on top of what is real. You're looking at an image that has a photo-real quality to it, but you know it's not real because what's happening in the image. So you're left with a sensation that leaves you questioning and wondering. At least this is what we wanted to achieve with it.

...you’re left with a sensation that leaves you questioning and wondering.

What are the advantages of digital fashion design, how could it change the industry?

At the moment, there is so much over-production and we really want to show that with the use of this digital world we can really waste a lot less! We are looking for new ways of presenting fashion, as fashion shows have been the same for over 100 years. We want to see whether we can create alternatives for photoshoots using digital super models (like for instance Shudugram or Lil Miquela) and putting them in environments that would've never been possible in real life. Digital fashion could also create a new way of tailoring, using 3D bodyscans and fitting them on the computer without the person ever being there. It is such a new market and there is still so much to discover, the possibilities are endless and right now we are focusing on digital e-commerce and virtual fitting through innovative initiatives. I always love this quote from Isaac Asimov, one of the founding fathers of artificial intelligence: "Things don't need to be real, when they seem to be."

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Thank you Amber for giving us an insight into the incredibly fascinating and futuristic world of digital fashion design!

Follow Amber here @amberjaeslooten and the Fabricant here @the_fab_ric_ant

 

Q & A with Fashion Designer Lena Kasparian

 We talk with Lena Kasparian ahead of her Vancouver Fashion Week showcase.

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MM: Can you introduce your brand and yourself in a few sentences?

My name is Lena Kasparian, I am a Fashion Designer and creative director of the brand. Lena Kasparian the black label is a brand that specialises in 'after 5' looks for men and women. I design cocktail, evening dresses, bridal gowns, and mens suits.

MM: Can you describe your creative process?

Well it all starts with an idea, then I draw up some concepts, which usually snowball into another idea. We get the technical sketches drawn up, then we select fabrics and materials to create the look and start sample production. From 1 design we create many looks and a collection comes to life.

MM: Where do you find inspiration in your day-to-day life?

Imagination is the key, I crave inspiration from old Hollywood movies, vintage glam; the way women and men use to dress in the 50’s was pure chic! A creative mind can grab inspiration from all aspects of life, thats what makes it so special.

MM: What kind of questions do you ask yourself when you begin creating a collection?

As a designer and a business woman I must consider all aspects of creating; the collection must flow and have purpose, where would the garment be worn, who will buy it, why would they buy it. The aesthetics and the structure of the piece must make sense and be visibly sound and beautiful without losing its integrity.

MM: How has your work evolved since you began your own label?

Developing skill takes time and as you grow and experience more you start to embrace the process, the evolution of fashion always evolves but the substance always maintains itself and you create signature looks which always play part in each collection and mine is consistent. I believe simplicity is always more elegant, and classic shapes will never go out of style.

MM: How do you find working as a designer in Australia? Has the culture/surroundings affected your design aesthetic? Do you feel connected to your home?

I don’t see myself designing for Australia but designing for an international market as we all crave glamour. Being Australian of an Armenian heritage gives me great understanding of my personal identity. Living in a multicultural country makes me feel connected to the whole world.

MM: What sparked your interest in fashion design?

My family has been in the rag trade for over a decade and still are. Working in fashion retail gave me insight of the industry and working with stylists taught me a lot about myself and my natural ability to create looks. People noticed my flare for design and gave me the encouragement to start my own label.

MM: How did you learn the business of fashion?

I'm self taught. Experience working in the jewellery and fashion trade gave me insight of the business aspect of the industry, and I learnt as I went along. Being hands on and doing the majority of the work myself was the best way.

MM: What is your favourite part of being a designer? What drives you to design?

When you have a passion brewing inside you then you will push yourself and challenge your abilities. It doesn’t matter if you fail, as long as you gave it a go. I love creating looks and making people feel beautiful, the idea of drawing a dress and then zipping it onto someones back gives me a thrill. It's the beauty of being a designer, bringing a creation to life.

MM: What is the inspiration behind your S/S19 collection to be showcased at Vancouver Fashion Week?

The collection is inspired by every day people who want to feel alive, confident, and sexy. I wanted to design garments using different textures and fabrics, such as velvet, fur, sequins and silks and to keep the collection flowing with a colour palette of black and fuchsia. My after 5 collection will suit all seasons keeping in mind a broad international spectrum, and it will appeal to all age groups with its versatile looks.

Thank you so much Lena for giving us an insight into your brand. We are very much looking forward to seeing the after 5 collection on the Vancouver Fashion Week runway this September!

@lenakasparian

Hanbok- traditional South Korean dress

Hanbok- traditional South Korean dress

Exploring the theme Nostalgia, we found ourselves at a fashion showcase in South Korea, at the Cheongdam Building Sky Lounge in Seoul to see designer Hyemi Song's new collection for her brand SEO DAM WHA. Beautiful models dressed in colourful opaque layers, performed a dance routine encircling the space, their lightweight dresses swishing and turning.

Read More

Teen Spirit, an Editorial

It's here, it's arrived! It's time for the last and final instalment of our Nostalgia themed fashion editorials. For Teen Spirit we took inspiration from the 1990's. We wanted to invoke feelings of celebration with a carefree air influenced by an era that, for a lot of us, brings back memories of childhood. It has been such a pleasure to explore these three decades over the last few months. One of the most fascinating things we found while styling and taking inspiration is getting to see how each individual is impacted differently by iconic moments in each of the decades. For some, the 90's means butterfly clips and jelly shoes, for others, grunge boots and chokers, and then theres those who just think of the Fresh Prince theme song. Whatever your 90's memories are, sit back, don't take yourself too seriously, and enjoy the photos!

As always we want to give a special thanks to Community Thrift and Vintage for supplying these rad 90's looks. Learn more about their vintage resale store on their website as well as their awesome mission. 

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Photography Byeongcheol Jo
Styling and Art Direction: Deanna Rule
Styling: Faye Cottrill
Models: Erin Chanyan & Gui Babilonia
Clothing Courtesy of: Community Thrift and Vintage 
 

Style Chronicles: Amandine Schmitt

we talk with French blogger and influencer Amandine Schmitt about her style

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My name is Amandine and I have the soul of a traveler. I moved around often in my childhood because I'm lucky to have a military dad. I traveled in a lot of countries and I had the opportunity to live the French adventure show called 'Kohlanta' in 2016, it’s a survival game better known as 'Survivor'. Since then I have kept traveling, every time I have the opportunity I take it.

Beyond my adventurous side, I love fashion. I live in the north east of France and the mentalities tend to differ according to the regions, but in Strasbourg I am able to adapt my style (rock, Parisian or boho) according to my moods.

My style essentials are blue jeans and black leather pants that I love to accessorize with a beautiful belt, a handbag, a pair of mules, or pretty boots.

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For me, the French style is elegant and chic but never shocking. When I'm outside of France I allow myself a sexier style, lighter while remaining elegant and natural. I love wearing a crop top or lace top with denim shorts or a flat skirt and accessorise it all with a cute handbag, hat and/or sunglasses.

I started a travel blog (www.soydine.com) that I intend to expand with fashion articles. I take care to incorporate my different outfits in each of my Instagram posts. This is so I can share the way my style changes through every country I visit. I always let myself be influenced by the atmosphere of the countries that I am in.

Some people take direct style inspiration from others, and you can appreciate this better when you yourself become a reference. Fashion really is a connection between people which is why I'm so drawn to it.

We loved hearing about Amandine's story, and we’re definitely inspired by her Parisian style.

Make sure to follow her on Instagram and check out her travel blog. 

Thank you, Amandine for taking the time to talk with us! 

 

Q & A with Fashion Designer Kan by Paulina Hernandez

We talk with Mexican designer Paulina Hernandez ahead of her Vancouver Fashion Week showcase

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MM: Can you introduce your brand and yourself in a few sentences?

Kan is tradition and design, taking you on a magic journey through the essence of the wonderful world of ethnic cultures and their unique regions. Inviting you to take in the authentic Cosmo-vision that all the Mexican ethnic groups have, and enjoying at the same time real quality and design. We take major inspiration from the enchanting seduction of them.

A bit about myself - I’m a 26 year old fashion designer that loves her country and the beach and took these two inspirations to create Kan.

MM: Can you describe your creative process?

Creative Process: this is one of the parts that I love the most! It all starts by night- thats when I get ideas for the designs and start investigating the images that we are going to use (the colours etc).

Once we have the designs and colours in our minds and on paper we take it to the computer, we do all the designs and prints that each piece will have. After this we import the fabrics from Colombia in white and start to create what I like to call 'the puzzle for printing'. After this they cut everything by hand and start the manufacture process, to create the finished printed swimwear. 

For the embroidered pieces the process is a little bit different -first we do every design and manufacture them and then I go with the Wirrarikas and together start playing with colours and shapes, and decide what will look better for each piece. It can be bikinis, Kimonos, ponchos etc and they will create all the embroidered pieces that you see by hand. Making the process such a beautiful one, artisanal, and most of all unique!

MM: Where do you find inspiration in your day-to-day life?

My inspiration from day to day life comes from my country with its colours, its people, its culture. 

You have to see Mexico to see all the love and life that we have here and I really think that's all the inspiration that you need to have fun, love, and create.

MM: What kind of questions do you ask yourself when you begin creating a collection?

What do I want people to know about Mexico?- what will make me different from the rest and how I can make unique pieces that show the parts of my country that I want people to get to know with unique and high-quality designs?

MM: How has your work evolved since you began your own label?

So much! The designs started in 2016 but the label came out to the public in February 2017, so it has been such an exciting journey and kind of fast, sometimes I can’t believe how far it has come in less than 2 years. We started with swimwear, now we have embroidered pieces of swimwear by the Wirrarikas, and this year we started with embroidered and unique clothing by the Wirrarikas (huicholes) too taking the brand to new places. We are very excited about this new part in our label. 

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MM: How do you find working as a designer in Mexico? Has the culture/surroundings affected your design aesthetic? Do you feel connected to your home?

Honestly it has been a magic journey! When I first started I was afraid that the label wouldn’t get any recognition, because fashion design here in México is kind of new but people and the reception has been unbelievable and I am so grateful for that.

And for the culture part -the surroundings is what I love the most about my country. Mexico is such a rich country; it's culture, colours, textures, and people gives me tons of design ideas.

Right now we are working with the Wirrarikas (huicholes) and all our images are from their religion. They make the embroidered pieces so I have really gotten to know a totally different part of my country and our culture, opening my heart and mind to new adventures and surroundings. I haven’t felt more close to home than I feel now. 

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MM: What sparked your interest in fashion design?

Since I was very young I have loved fashion but I think that what woke up the most interest in me is all the stories that you can tell in one piece of clothing; all the history, culture, feelings, atmosphere of a time in just a single piece. I love how you can drive people to such different emotions and help them feel great. 

MM: How did you learn the business of fashion?

I studied Fashion Design here in Mexico at a School called Imaginarte in Guadalajara. I also took some courses in Barcelona and in New York city. I also had the wonderful opportunity to work for a great Mexican designer at New York Fashion Week for a couple of years.

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MM: What is your favourite part of being a designer? What drives you to design?

My favourite part is that I can be creative and everything in my imagination can be taken into reality. Also that I have had the opportunity to work and get to know beautiful and wonderful people, without being a designer I probably would never have met them!

What drives me to design is being able to share what's in my heart, my dreams, my passion in one piece, that will not only tell my story but many stories.

MM: What is the inspiration behind your S/S 19 collection to be showcased at Vancouver Fashion Week?

The Wirrarikas. And this collection wouldn’t exist without them! It was such a journey -from meeting them, getting to know so much more about them and their culture, and then being able to work with them has been such a blessing.

Thank you, Paulina for sharing your brand's story with us! We're looking forward to seeing your vibrant collection on the Vancouver Fashion Week runway in September!

Find Kan by Paulina on Instagram or on the website here.

Khatsahlano Festival - Street Style Highlights

Images by Bang & Tia
Learn more about the West 4th Khatsahlano Street Party here

FASHIONCLASH Festival- Show 2

Steven Vanderyt

Vancouver Fashion Week Award winner Steven Vanderyt's collection brings a new kind of seduction to the runway. The palette for OLD TOWN GIRLS  in black & white with red accent colour mirrors the Sin City comic that its inspired by. Silks, chiffons and wools are contrasted with leathers and latex.

ENCLOTHED COGNITION

A collaborative project from fashion designer Bregje Cox and visual artist Mark King, this is a fun menswear collection with a vibrant colour palette, and experiments in shape and scale. The Enclothed Cognition collection seeks to empower others by bringing awareness to the interplay between the clothes we wear, the built environment, and the human mind.

MUKASHI MUKASHI

Lithuanian label MUKASHI MUKASHI presented a conceptual collection 'Animus', which looks at the struggle to balance between remaining unique and fitting in with society. The crisp contrasts and oversized silhouettes stood out to us.

 

http://fashionclash.nl/

Photography by Team Peter Stigter

FASHIONCLASH Festival- Show 1

D.A.I.

We love the subtle use of print in this menswear collection by DuAsInfinity; the vibrant coloured patterns contrast beautifully with the pastel outer layers.

Rita Sá

Vancouver Fashion Week Award winner Rita Sá wowed the crowd with a bold blue unisex collection. The monochrome palette pushes emphasis on clever pattern cutting and textured layers. The collection 'Glass Ceiling' explores the world of hypocrisy of the individuals who believe that it is better to be a false somebody than a true nobody.

Amy Ollett

Amy Ollett's enveloping forms create new shapes and silhouettes. Collection 'MOVERE' combines her training as a dancer and choreographer with design, exploring the interface between dance, fashion, movement and design and is informed by the properties of fabric.

 

Stay tuned for more of our reports from the FASHIONCLASH Festival...

http://fashionclash.nl/

Photography by Team Peter Stigter

FASHIONCLASH- MAFAD Academy Showcase

As part of the Fashion Clash festival, the Maastricht Academy of Fine Arts and Design presented their graduate show. We were blown away by the incredible talent of these young designers.

Here are our favourites:

Jessie Witters

We're into the tropical feel to the collection SWEET ASPHYXIA, inspired by wild overgrown nature. The exotic colour palette accentuates the feminine silhouettes.

Nathan Klein

This contemporary menswear collection by Indonesian designer Nathan Klein presents a new meaning for masculinity in fashion. We love the deep forest green colour and matching set look.

Pia Walter

Outdoor-inspired collection 'AWE' is about balancing our technology-filled lives with experiences in nature, merging elements from camping-equipment and army clothing with sportswear and digital prints. One of the pieces can be zipped out into a tent-like structure! The collection is a cool cross between nature and technology.

Laura Van der Spoel

We love the incredibly creative use of texture in this line. With a focus on experimentations in materials, Laura has created a modern and artistic vision.

Nienke Creemers

The goal of Creemers grad collection 'UNPICKING COTTON' is a form of protest against the exploitation used in the fashion industry for hundreds of years, and as a protest against herself as a designer. Powerful words expressed on a colour popping palette.

Nieke Verkennis

Verkennis' girlish colour palette, and focus on creative textures creates an array of visual intrigue. We love the playful feel.

 

Through these incredibly creative grad collections we can see a growing trend in work with social relevance, looking at making the world more ethically responsible. A strong focus on experimental textures also shows the student's passion for material techniques.

Stay tuned for more of our reports from the FASHIONCLASH Festival...

http://fashionclash.nl/

Photography by Team Peter Stigter

FASHIONCLASH Festival 2018- Fashion My Religion!

Taking place over the weekend of 15 - 17 June 2018 in Maastricht, the Netherlands, the 10-year anniversary edition of the international and interdisciplinary FASHIONCLASH Festival in Maastricht featured more than 100 designers and artists from all over the world.

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The festival was composed within a 3-day program, and the route?- an inspiring pilgrimage along 26 locations with expositions, theatre and dance performances and talks and contributions by Didem Tali, Dalia Vann, Das Leben am Haverkamp, Elise Crutzen, Sem Shayne, Anton Fayle, KEVIN.MURPHY and many more. We love the festival's colourful cake branding, how creative!

Theme: Fashion My Religion!
The overarching theme of the festival 'Fashion My Religion!' boldly dove into one of the most current themes of the moment; religion. Specifically, the relation between religion and gender, hair style and clothing. FASHIONCLASH challenged participants and visitors to research, highlight or break existing religious traditions and taboos by way of using fashion. A call to activism that hopefully inspires a new generation of fashion- makers and lovers to fulfil their role as meaningful as they can.

From this perspective designers are shaping the future of the shape of things to come. What is the role of our cultural heritage in a constantly changing world? How are new generation designers dealing with their cultural heritage (ancestry and traditions) in a globalised world where everything seems to be at reach?
 

The meeting between fashion and religion isn’t a new one. Religious idioms and luxury have been used for decades by many within fashion. Sometimes just for ethical motives, other times with a dose of criticism. With ‘Fashion My Religion’ we are placing the audience and the designer in an interesting area of tension; fashion versus religion or cutting-edge versus tradition. We take a closer look at cultural expressions of personal, modern meaning and more traditional ones. We place historical absolutes opposite from modern-day fluid truths by really going in on social matters such as, feminism and human rights. Through (fashion) design we dissect the ever-changing awareness around the relationship we have with our environment and come up with new stories and approaches to ‘fashion and religion’.

For more information about the festival and participants visit fashionclash.nl

Stay tuned for more- we will take you through our favourite fashion collections from the festival!

Favourites from Ravensbourne at Graduate Fashion Week

Recently the Micro Macro team had the privilege of attending Graduate Fashion Week in London, the world's leading runway event celebrating the creativity of students and graduates within fashion. Showcasing the work of over 1,000 of the very best students and graduates from the most influential and inspiring universities around the world,  the event really represents the future of creative design talent. We continue to a look at some of our top picks in student's work. Today our focus is on Ravenbourne University London at Graduate Fashion Week...

Alexia K Amaning

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Alexia impressed me with a solid colour combination. The overall attitude of her design had a strong streetwear component, with large earrings and oversized accessories. The juxtaposition of this stylistic choice with pastel colours was a nice surprise, bringing something new to the streetwear aesthetic. 

Eleanor Maylin

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Like a breath of fresh air between the almost overwhelming array of brightly coloured collections, Eleanor Maylin came in just in time with smartly constructed garments in neutral nude tones. 

Stay tuned for more highlights from inspiring student's work at Graduate Fashion Week.

Images by @rosalindalcazarphotography.

Favourites from Kingston University at Graduate Fashion Week

Recently the Micro Macro team had the privilege of attending Graduate Fashion Week in London, the world's leading runway event celebrating the creativity of students and graduates within fashion. Showcasing the work of over 1,000 of the very best students and graduates from the most influential and inspiring universities around the world,  the event really represents the future of creative design talent. We continue to a look at some of our top picks in student's work. Today our focus is on Kingston University at Graduate Fashion Week...

Isobel Traynor

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Isobel Traynor's work really made an impression on us. We love the simple colour palette and focus on textural manipulations.

Amie Hartland

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Amie Hartland's womenswear collection plays with both the feminine and the masculine. Flirty pleated skirts are contrasted with oversized denim jackets and elongated sleeve details. Amie's clothes show a lot of frayed edges.

Stay tuned for more highlights from inspiring student's work at Graduate Fashion Week.

Images by @rosalindalcazarphotography.