Bold and Sophisticated: Women’s Fashion at the 2019 Deighton Cup

The 2019 Deighton Cup event returned for its 11th year on July 20 and it was one for the books. The annual horse races celebrated with cocktails, oysters, macarons, cigars, and the well-dressed socialites placing their bets. As one of the few occasions where Vancouverites can showcase their fashion creativity in full swing, everyone eagerly showed off their style.

Without a cloud in the sky, the bold and bright suits, dresses, fascinators, and top hats shined at Hastings Racecourse. Flowing gowns, midi length dresses, and visually striking hand-made hats and fascinators complemented the reds, pinks, yellows, blues, whites, and champagne colour palette. Women in pairs gave a slight nod to their partner’s looks with matching colours or flowers—while some women wore one colour from head to toe, coordinated with their friends or matched with one of the Audis parked in front of the VIP booths. 

The best dressed were given cash prizes in the Style Stakes Awards, for the man and woman who “push the fashion envelope in dressing to impress.” The Belle du Jour and Gallant Sartorialist winners this year were picked by Liz Bell, who has walked the runways of Dior, Fendi, Karl Lagerfeld, and more. 

Judged on creativity and style, the womenswear cash prize was awarded to Victoria Fawkes, whose hand-made hat represented the racehorse track—complete with grass, riders, and fences. Fawkes’ 1950s style pink dress was complimented with pearls, white gloves, and a small stylish handbag.

Bold looks didn’t just stem from the Style Stakes candidates. Most notably, a woman dressed up like a hot air balloon with eight to ten large helium balloons over her head. The ropes keeping them in place were held by four women trailing behind her. 

Since Vancouver is known for its laid-back West Coast style, it was exciting to see the women dressed up similarly to British and Australian horse race attendees. “This is a great event because people want to get dressed up,” explains a Deighton Cup regular—her outfit worthy enough for a royal wedding. “We can go out anytime with our friends but can’t get dressed up like this unless someone is getting married.” 

Asides the men who sported pineapple, flamingo and dollar bill patterned suits, the annual fashion social event not only proved Vancouverites can dress up, but they know how to have a great time doing so. 

Check out our men’s coverage here-

Dapper and Gallant: Men’s Fashion at the Deighton Cup

Photos contributed.

deightoncup.com

@deightoncup

Dapper and Gallant: Men's Fashion at the 2019 Deighton Cup

The 11th annual Deighton Cup returned to Hastings Racecourse in Vancouver this on Saturday, July the 20th, and for one day of the year, it wasn’t faux pas to be overdressed on the West Coast.

Building off last year’s event of 7,000 attendees, this edition seemed even more popular, with the track concourse nearly full to capacity, and a variety of vendors offering cigars, oysters and cocktails to enjoy in the hot summer sun. 

Two of the day’s best-dressed won cash prizes in front of a panel of judges in the “Style Stakes” Awards for being crowned Gallant Sartorialist and Belle de Jour respectively amongst fierce competition. Between the glasses of champagne and panama hats, there was even horse racing.

The Deighton Cup is an especially notable day for menswear in Vancouver, a city where walking down the street wearing a full suit often makes you look out of place, save for a stretch of several blocks between Granville Central Station and Coal Harbour. Case in point, as several members of the Micro Macro team waited for a cab after the event, a woman approached to ask why everyone was so dressed up, wondering if there was a themed wedding happening in the neighbourhood. 

This seems to be the prevailing assumption in town, that you should only be dressed up for a notable life event or company Christmas party. There is a sharp drop off after this, where people often revert to athleisure, meaning anything you can wear to cycle lazily around Stanley Park on a Sunday on a tandem bike and even lead a lunch meeting if you work in tech. Of course, this is a functional style choice that makes sense for the city we live in. However, it is always interesting to see how people dress up when given the chance.

Going in with this bias, it was a surprise to see such a strong menswear showing at the event. As it grows in popularity, more men are eager to plan ahead for an outfit suited for the races. This growth is assisted by the growth of made-to-measure tailoring, both online and in-store, that have made it affordable and easy for anyone to have a custom suit made, and to make outside-the-box choices when it comes to style.

A pleasant surprise at the event was the use of summer suiting fabrics, with many breezy and dapper linen and cotton pieces taking center stage. Investing in a summer suit for Vancouver can be somewhat counterintuitive, as the temperature this summer has rarely hovered near thirty degrees Celsius. However, pieces that would’nt have looked in a place at a Tuscan vineyard wedding were seen frequently.

A finalist in the Gallant Sartorialist award, Martin Barclay showed off one of the more unique suits at the event, a wide striped blue and maroon ensemble with a cane and gold lapel chain in the shape of a lion’s head. The gold chain and other pieces are expected to be part of Barclay’s own men’s accessories line Tyrock Barclay, which is currently in development.

Another honourable mention goes to Kelvin Lopes, who showed off a three piece suit from Surmesur Custom Menswear in a chocolate brown, with extra wide peak lapels and a shawl-collar vest, accented by white tassled loafers. This look is versatile across seasons, and showed excellent use of often-overlooked customizations that can make any suit stand out.

When asked about whether the event was helping to make Vancouver into a stronger menswear city, Lopes was optimistic. 

Pictured: Kelvin Lopes (third from left) with friends.

Pictured: Kelvin Lopes (third from left) with friends.

“I definitely think the Deighton Cup can help Vancouver improve its fashion sense,” he said. “It’s a great event where people get to actually put some effort into dressing well in a city where Lululemon is king.“

As this edition of what is arguably Vancouver’s top menswear event comes to a close, its influence on suiting culture can’t be understated. An event like this is about getting people out of their comfort zone and trying to out-dress their friends and the strangers around them. Even though Vancouver may never be a city known for suits, at least one day a year, we can feel like it has that potential.

Check out our women’s coverage here-

Bold and Sophisticated: Women’s Fashion at the Deighton Cup

Photos contributed.

deightoncup.com

@deightoncup

A Night of Art, Fashion and R&B in Gastown

Event organizer 2Cream2Sugar, in collaboration with the Hide+Seek group, showcased a wide range of local artists Saturday, May 25 at their “Street Dreams” warehouse party in Gastown.

Featuring a multidisciplinary lineup of visual artists, fashion designers and musicians, the night saw a wide range of creative influences in an intimate studio space. After watching the Toronto Raptors beat the Milwaukee Bucks to reach the NBA Finals on a large projected screen, the crowds were in a good mood to enjoy visual art displayed around the space all night long, and runway shows of local fashion designers paired with musical acts.

Several designers presented reworked fashion pieces including ACiD ART in their debut show, and KSLAM clothing, the product of Casey Lamb who was featured here after her designs were shown in the S/S19 edition of Vancouver Fashion Week. KSLAM’s key pieces included a dress made completely of reworked leather belts, and accessories constructed of dangling knife blades. Kash Kulture and JB Gear rounded out the night with streetwear offering.

^ only Fara and Elijah Blond were R&B artists, the others fall into the category of Hip Hop. Girard a rapper joined Elijah on stage and DKAY, another rapper, also joined FARA on stage. Teon Gibbs was accompanied by Makadi and Amber Bayani who are R&B vocalists.

R&B acts Fara, and Elijah Bond paired well with runway shows, especially Fara who energized the crowd with 90’s covers and her own original content. Elijah Blond and Kid Sharif later ushered in the night with darker, trap-influenced tracks. Visual artists Mescondi Photography, Taylor Borque Designs, Tim Rolls, Dani Oz, and Max Bryan introduced a range of art on display and for sale. When asked about the idea behind 2Cream2Sugar’s Vancouver events, organizer SJ preaches the importance of bringing together groups of creatives that may not usually share the same stage.

“Community over everything,” they said. “Specific to Vancouver, the visual artists, musicians and designers in the past have kind of been in their own little silos. But that’s slowly been changing as the creative scene here grows—that’s why 2C2S’s past few shows have been about tearing down those barriers and bringing the entire creative community together.”

SJ also feels fortunate to have the opportunity to put on 2C2S’s events during a period of time that is favourable for the grassroots creative scene, especially over the course of the past decade where creative events have moved away from being commercially-driven, and not focused on accessibility. 2C2S is one of many groups running without external funding that SJ claims “do whatever [they] can with no help from the corporate side of art and music in the city.”

This attitude towards showcasing creativity resulted in an evening where a diverse group of creatives could flaunt their latest work and build connections with other members of the community. In an environment where spaces to organize these kinds of events on can be expensive and difficult to secure, it seems best to get as many artists under one roof as possible.

2Cream2Sugar is planning to hold a similar event in Vancouver this July.

Article Cover Photo

Nick Brons

Featured Artists:

Fashion

ACiD ART

JB GEAR

Sleepless Mindz Clothing&Design

KSLAM

Kash Kulture Apparel 604

Music

Teon Gibbs

Kid Sharif

Elijah Blond

Fara

Ryu Darko

Visual Artists

Mescondi Photography

Taylor Borque Designs

Tim Rolls

Dani Oz

nayrbxam

Yellow Is Forbidden: Designer Guo Pei

When Rihanna walked the red carpet at the 2015 Met Gala sporting a 25-kilo dress spun from gold and fox fur, the fashion world gawked, and a new star was born: Chinese designer Guo Pei. Raised in Beijing (and still based there), Guo has become much more than a top fashion personage—being Chinese, she is both a living example of China’s rising fortunes and a political symbol, whether she wishes to be or not (she says not), of the possibilities for achievement under the Chinese regime. (It is not for nothing that Time magazine put her on its list of the world’s 100 most influential people in 2016).

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Now, the legendary designer’s story has spurred the new documentary Yellow is Forbidden, made by Auckland filmmaker Pietra Brettkelly.

Brettkelly’s deep-dive chronicle of Guo as person, fashion star and emblem benefits enormously from the fact that she had full cooperation from the energetic designer. But this isn’t hagiography: the behind-the-scenes access to the preparations for Guo’s make-or-break Paris runway show, while both fascinating and tense, show the conflicted side of the fashion world and Guo’s place in it.

With a client list that includes Beyonce and Rihanna, fashion lovers ought to be waiting on the edge of their seats to see this eye-opening story and Vancouverites have the chance to see the film on the big screen this week at the Vancouver International Film Festival. Yellow is Forbidden (https://goviff.org/yellow-is-forbidden/) is playing Oct 7 & 10, with Guo Pei herself set to attend the film’s opening screening at the Vancouver Playhouse on the 7th, ahead of an exhibition of her work titled Guo Pei: Couture Beyond opening at the Vancouver Art Gallery (https://www.vanartgallery.bc.ca/the_exhibitions/exhibit_guopei.html) later this month.

More information about Yellow is Forbidden can be found at the VIFF website: https://goviff.org/yellow-is-forbidden/)

For $2 off your ticket price, order online with the promo code VF18YELLOW

 

Trailer: https://vimeo.com/262913757

 

FILM REVIEW: A PERFECT 14

A film about women reshaping the world.

Where? A film preview at the historic Cultch Theatre in Vancouver, a red carpet event with local influencers, media, film industry and fashion models including the main subjects of the film.

What? The first film of its kind, a feature length documentary about plus-sized models.

With a focus on 3 plus-sized models from around the world (Elly Mayday -Canada, Laura Wells- Australia, and Kerosene Deluxe-The Netherlands), A Perfect 14 follows personal journeys whilst taking a broader look at the harsh beauty standards in the modelling industry.

At some parts cutting and emotional, the film really makes you feel for these women and the struggles they overcome. A Perfect 14 grips you in showing you elements of culture that you're not normally exposed to, going behind the scenes and shedding light on issues prevalent in the industry.

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Being excluded from the world of ‘human coat hangers’ or the industry standard of 34"-24"-34", these women have faced discrimination in their work and personal life, but as their stories unfold we watch them overcoming ever more challenges. As the filmmakers Giovanna Morales Vargas and James Earl O’Brien explain at the preview event, their shooting style is very raw and unscripted, so they were not entirely sure what to expect or what drama was going to unfold in A Perfect 14.

During the filming Elly Mayday, a Canadian Plus-sized model from Saskatchewan, was diagnosed with Ovarian cancer. As viewers we get a glimpse into her journey from recovery to runway. It is incredibly inspiring to watch Elly embrace the baldness and the scars, really solidifying her mantra to be happy with your body the way that it is, and to believe in yourself. The film ends with Elly fulfilling her dream of becoming a model in New York. Her story feels so touching as it’s so genuine, and plagued with difficulties.

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“Women are as strong as hell”-Elly Mayday
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Another palpable feeling we sense in watching this doc is frustration. Ironically, plus-sized model Laura Wells explains how on shoots she often resorts to wearing ‘fat pads’ to fill out her size 14 body to a size 16 (UK), adding to her stomach and thighs. On these occasions, her body isn’t deemed large enough for ‘plus size’. This sense of irony is also illustrated through Elly’s story, when as her cancer treatment takes its toll, and she loses weight, some plus-sized model fans condemn her, exclaiming through social media that she is now too skinny. Through this turn of events, the message of the documentary runs clear, you have to foster your own source of self-love. As plus-sized model Kerosene Deluxe explains ‘we don’t need validation from other people to feel self-worth’ encouraging the audience at the Cultch, to practice ‘radical self-love as a form of anarchy’.

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A Perfect 14 is an incredible reflection of the strength of these women, showing us how to be warriors, how to be strong. We see the beauty of imperfection fully realised. The film also demonstrates the positive side of Social Media as a network to boost our sense of personal wellbeing, to look out for one another, and to come together to make a change for a more inclusive industry.

Kerosene Deluxe’s top tip for a boost of self-love- 'make a list of things that make you, you!'

How do you foster your feelings of self-love?

Film stills courtesy of http://www.aperfect14.com/

A LOVE LETTER TO STREET STYLE

follow at @iamkrystalkay

follow at @iamkrystalkay

My style inspiration has always come from what I see people wearing on the street. It's those moments when I bump into someone at a coffee shop and realise that I'm obsessed with their jacket or love their shoes. When I see someone combine certain colours in a unique way, I think, 'Oh, I could do that.' or 'I have a dress that would look great with that jacket.' Street style is this endless stream of possibilities. It's an expressive form of creativity that gets displayed to the world on our bodies every day. This is my love letter to that concept. 

I admire these people. The beauty of it really lies in the fact that most of them aren't professionals. They're baristas, graphic designers, accountants, therapists, you name it! The point is that they aren't getting paid to be a part of the fashion industry. It's not their job to know the colour of the season or the trends we'll be wearing six months from now. They're just regular people expressing themselves through what they wear. At most, to them, styling is just a hobby, and they're actually really good at it. 

follow at @mars3lwallace

follow at @mars3lwallace

I find unique street fashion so inspirational because of its inherit bravery. The girl walking down the street isn't going to be making any statement on the red carpet.  She'll piece together a creative look simply because she wants to and has the guts to pull it off. She might get a few compliments, some people might stare and not understand the style, but that's it, she'll go throughout her day and wear something else tomorrow. 

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That's where we come in. I think some time ago I realised that if I took a photo of someone every time I thought, 'I love her look' or 'his outfit is on point' I would have this incredible library of real people modelling their personal expression en plein air. Through our street style pictures on Micro Macro, we get to share that moment of admiration with whoever is willing to look. That's really special to me. This is an unapologetic celebration of street style. 

Peace and love, Deanna

Photos by: ByeongCheol Jo